A good military style entrenching shovel can be the difference between life and death when you’re out there all alone, and this foldable beauty can be hauled with you everywhere you go. Made from tough carbon steel, it will dig through whatever ground you need it to, while the pickaxe that comes with it ensures that you’ll be able to break through those extra-tough complications along the way.
Denier is the term that is most often used to suggest the strength of the threads in the fabric used to create the pack. And when it comes to the quality of the seams, look for a pack that advertises double-stitched seams if you want a pack that will last longer and holds up against the environmental factors it could be exposed to in the event of an emergency. Ultimately, your pack is an investment in your survival and the contents of the BOB don’t do any good if your pack fails and you can’t carry everything.
Having a well-stocked emergency kit in your car is a good place to start if you're taking a road trip. If you're camping or hiking, you'll want some survival supplies in your pack. The old saying holds true -- it's better to have something and not need it than to need it and not have it. On the following pages, we'll walk you through the 10 items that should go in every survival kit.
If your bag is so heavy that you can’t carry it more than a few miles, you’ll have to ditch some of the items, anyway. And what’s going to happen if you have to run from attackers, jump walls, and climb fences? Having a bag that’s too heavy could get you killed. Ideally, a bug out bag should weigh about 15% of your body weight, assuming you’re in decent shape. 20% of your body weight should be the absolute maximum.
So our personal survival tip is to share your food as God would lead you (once you’ve put your faith in Christ and have made the decision to live according to God’s Word), and trust that even if you’ve given your last bite to eat that He already has the next day written and plans to bring provision perhaps greater than the stores you just gave away.

Everyone’s needs when they Bug Out are different. So your Bug Out Bag should suit your needs. Your size/strength, number in party, where you plan to go and for how long will determine what goes in the bag. Bigger groups can share load weights. The only way to determine which bag works for you is to research and try the different sized and designed back packs. In the end, the weight you’ll be carrying may determine whether an external frame or internal frame will be best.
You can shop for Augason Farms emergency food kits directly on the company’s website, but items like the well-equipped 30-Day Emergency Food Storage Pail are available through Amazon. This kit packs 29 pounds of food into an 8.5-gallon pail. It includes 307 total servings and 54,670 calories. This is enough to sustain one person for 30 days at 1,800 calories per day or 4 people at 1,800 calories per day for 7 days. 
A good flashlight is a necessity in the survival game, but a flashlight that’s also built to serve as a car window breaker, with an attached seatbelt cutter, is a true survival gem. This is the sort of thing you don’t realize how much you need until, well, until you really need it. It can be the true difference between life and death in an accident situation.
So despite the impression many people got from my “50 Items” article, I don’t think you should pack your bug out bag with as many items as possible. In fact, I think you should check your bag for any non-essential items with a large weight-to-space ratio and remove them. To that end, here’s a list of survival items I’ve seen in various lists online that, in my opinion, you don’t really need in your bug out bag.
A “Bug out bag” (sometimes called a “bail out bag” or “survival bag”) is loosely defined as a backpack-style bag that a person keeps at the ready in case they need to evacuate in a hurry (bug out) due to natural disaster, civil unrest, fire, war or any other similar type of calamity. A bug out bag won’t be much good should a comet the size of Dallas hit the earth but for the type of events listed above it can make the difference between thriving and barely surviving.
Cold weather gloves: A sturdy pair of gloves will provide you with better grip, protect your hands from cuts and splinters, offer warmth in low temperatures, and keeps your hands clean to reduce the risk of infection. In the aftermath of a disaster, you may be tasked with moving fallen branches, gathering firewood, or making your way through broken glass, and high-quality gloves will give you the dexterity to accomplish these tasks.

Meat lovers can rejoice to know that it’s not all veggie goodness. The company also offers ready-to-go kits like a Three-Day Carnivore Kit for Two People. This meaty meal plan includes unique dishes like Chiang Mai Coconut Curry with Beef and Cincinnati-style Chili with Beef. You can customize the kit by mixing and matching the entrees to make it just right for your palate. 
This was a great article but I have to say that as far as fire arms go I wouldn’t suggest a .22LR. Yes the ammunition is light and yes you can carry more but in a self defense situaton a .22 isn’t an ideal round. I would suggest if it’s a rifle your looking for go with a .556 NATO or .223 because they are still light weight rounds and they would be more beneficial they are great for defense and hunting larger game. As far as hand guns go a revolver is reliable but the rounds are heavy and most of them are quite bulky a 9mm Luger would be your best bet because they are reliable and the ammunition is one of the common and available round there is so even if you run out obtaining them won’t be that difficult. Plus most full size double stack mags carry around 10-17 rounds which means more rounds before you have to reload.
Shop for deluxe bags stocked with rations that meet QSS standards for calories and protein intake, like the Emergency Essentials Deluxe 72-Hour Food, Water & Gear Pack. Take note that the emergency food supply inside of the included backpack is just shakes—but it packs a whopping 2,080 calories per day, along with 99 grams of protein per day. This kit will fill you up and is a good choice if you think you’ll need to take your emergency food supply on the go.

There’s an energy bar nowadays for every taste. Look for brands with a high calorie count as well as plenty of protein and a wide range of nutrients. Chocolate bars – Chocolate can be a quick source of energy and a great morale booster, while also being generous in calories. (Chocolate is also likely to become a commodity in demand in the weeks and months following a disaster.)
Design – The best bug out bag is one with plenty of pockets. This allows you to compartmentalize your bug out bag essentials so that you know exactly where everything is and you don’t have to dig through mountains of other stuff to find what you need. Put all your fire and light things together such as tactical flashlight, candles, headlamp, fire starting kit and storm proof matches. Put maps, GPS devices, compass and other navigation related items in their own pocket and so on. The more you can separate things the easier it will be to transcend your difficulties.

Any number of catastrophic disasters could occur. A hurricane that wipes out the shoreline and devastates communities several miles inland. Or a super-typhoon that strikes an island nation, turning life upside down for cities and neighborhoods.It could even be a terrorist attack with a WMD or the much feared EMP attack that shuts down power across a nation, interrupting transportation and shipping for several weeks, resulting in widespread food shortages.
Most ultralight emergency shelters allow condensation to build up inside as you get warm, leaving your clothes soaking wet. With the Escape Bivvy, condensation is no longer an issue. The proprietary fabric lets moisture escape as it keeps rain, snow and wind out, while reflecting your body heat back to you. Imported. Opened dimensions: 84"L x 36"W. 
Weight: 8.5 oz.
That’s true, we do. It’s clear that we can’t carry everything to survive for a year or more on our backs and we count on our stash at point B. If it’s not there, we do the best we can, go to a FEMA camp or die. What are our alternatives? I think that most people will go to point B if they see the problem before it arrives (hurricane) but a surprise nuclear attack on Houston (in my case) would necessitate a quick exit along with everyone else still alive. As to ‘bring it’, I certainly would if a. I had an operational vehicle and b. the roads were clear enough to get around minor obstacles – I don’t and won’t have a two ton or half track at my disposal. If not of if my vehicle becomes untenable along the way, I’ll put on my boots and my BOB and do the best I can. As you say, there are many scenarios.
I love the post, and the comments… heck the entire site is ingenious. If I could make a tiny contribution it would be the ICSB kit. It’s something I took away from my earliest days in LRS. It’s true that we seem to have kits within kits (hygiene kit, med kit, fishing kit all packed into a bug out kit) but it’s a handy way of compartmentalising our kit for quick access. Being able to access things quickly quietly and sometimes in the dark can be a lifesaver. So I offer up the ICSB kit. Stands for In Case S#$& Breaks. Some of the items are already on your lists but it’s nice to have them all in the same place when something breaks at the least opportune time. It’s a little pouch with duct tape, bailing wire, super glue, safety pins. Zip ties, key rings, buttons, carpet thread, twine, and anything else that is small and fits into this category. Anyway, that’s my two bits. Thanks for all the good info.
Having enough stored food and water during an emergency can literally mean the difference between survival and not. In the short term, you can prepare for the unexpected by purchasing and storing nonperishable food items, properly preserving perishable food, and using empty beverage containers to store water in your garage or basement. Stock your emergency food supply to feed your family and perhaps a little extra as "trade goods".

In arctic or alpine areas, survival kits may have additional cold weather clothing (winter hats and gloves), sleeping bags, chemical "hand warmer" packets, sun glasses/snow goggles, snowshoes, a collapsible shovel, a snare wire for small animals, a frying pan, a camp stove, camp stove fuel, a space blanket, matches, a whistle, a compass, tinder, medical equipment, a flint strike, a wire saw, extra socks and a tent designed for arctic use.
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