Prepping is kinda associated with people who prep for stupidly over the top unlikely SHTF scenarios were if the world as we know it has gone then yes maybe a lot of electronics will be useless, but not all, the longer you keep your mobile alive the longer you could have access to what is basically an e-reader which could house millions of survival books and associated materials like mechanics, first aid etc etc, I’d rather carry my tiny phone and a few batteries and a small solar charger than the weight of a stack of books, because in reality you’d need much more knowledge to survive than the significant majority of people possess in their heads, knowledge is power.
I agree with Mike in his statement that United Cutlery is a very substandard company. Also, the ONLY decent quality hollow handle survival knife that I’ve seen is made by Randall and costs several hundred dollars. I would never choose a hollow, storage handle knife for main line survival purposes. You are definitely best off purchasing a quality carbon steel blade by Ontario, Camillus, Becker, Cold Steel, etc. Also, while some stainless steel alloys are excellent for knife blades, generally speaking they are subpar when compared to carbon steel. Rust is not an issue to those who know how to maintain a blade and good carbon steel has far superior edge holding ability.
Our writers spent 11 hours researching the most popular survival food companies on the market. Before making their final recommendations, they considered 40 different survival food companies overall, screened options from 23 different brands and manufacturers, read over 100 user reviews (both positive and negative), and tested 4 of the survival food companies themselves. All of this research adds up to recommendations you can trust.
I love the post, and the comments… heck the entire site is ingenious. If I could make a tiny contribution it would be the ICSB kit. It’s something I took away from my earliest days in LRS. It’s true that we seem to have kits within kits (hygiene kit, med kit, fishing kit all packed into a bug out kit) but it’s a handy way of compartmentalising our kit for quick access. Being able to access things quickly quietly and sometimes in the dark can be a lifesaver. So I offer up the ICSB kit. Stands for In Case S#$& Breaks. Some of the items are already on your lists but it’s nice to have them all in the same place when something breaks at the least opportune time. It’s a little pouch with duct tape, bailing wire, super glue, safety pins. Zip ties, key rings, buttons, carpet thread, twine, and anything else that is small and fits into this category. Anyway, that’s my two bits. Thanks for all the good info.
According to the Bug Out Bag Academy, the origins of bug out bags can be traced to the bags that many aviators in the military put together before missions. These were first referred to as ‘bail-out bags’ and they held items that would be critical for survival if a plane was shot down or experienced critical engine failure. Many WWII aviators actually carried gold or silver bullions in their bug out bags, as these were (and still largely are) considered the ‘universal currency’.
Food Storage. Many years ago the Farmer's Almanac advised it's readers to keep a years supply of food on hand in case of emergencies. It was good advise back then and it's good advise today and easier to accomplish. Freeze dried food in vacuum sealed packaging is readily available from a wide variety of excellant companies and they have a very long shelf life. Properly dry-packed foods can have a very long shelf life according to the Mormon church's Provident Living website. For example, dry packed white rice, pinto beans, and sugar under the best conditions can be safely stored for 30+ years. Commercial dry packing for long term storage is usually done in #10 long term food storage cans or by do it yourselfers in sealed mylar bags with oxygen absorbers inside of polly buckets.
What to Put in a Bug Out Bag? – If your pre-made bug out bag focuses on tactical and survival gear you’ll need to finish it by purchasing dehydrated meals and other foodstuffs with long shelf lives. If the bag focuses on food you’ll need to supply survival gear such as a flashlight or two, emergency blankets, first aid kit, paracord, EDC knife and other things. If you’re making your own bug out bag read the answer to the next question.
There’s no denying the that first aid kit, paracord, emergency tent, waterproof poncho, compass, tactical gloves, candles and more will all come in handy should you find yourself forced to flee with no shelter in sight. The tomahawk will also save you the need to try and harvest wood for a fire using a survival knife and the machete, beyond its obvious self-defense cred, may come in handy if you decide to hack some underbrush to make a cover for your shelter. Where this bug out bag drops the ball a bit is in having virtually no purified water (although to be fair it does include a water filter) and only a single package of emergency rations. Nonetheless if you find yourself wandering the wild due to natural disaster this bug out bag when augmented with food and water, will stand you in good stead.
SHTF is an acronym that stands for sh*t hits the fan. This means that something drastic has happened, like a natural disaster, financial crisis, or a war has started. This term is generally used for when things go south quickly. The other acronym that is commonly used to signal it is time to pull out your bug out bag is ‘TEOTWAWKI’. This stands for ‘the end of the world as we know it’.
Size – Everyone overestimates how much they’re carrying when they go backpacking (if everyone who claimed to carry a 100 pound pack actually did we’d have thousands of hiker deaths every year in the US alone). But a survival situation is one time when you need to be cold-light-of-day honest about how much you can carry and what that load should be comprised of to give you the best possible chance of survival. As a general rule you shouldn’t carry more than 15 or 20% of your body weight, which for most people will be between 20 and 40 pounds. With this in mind you’ll want to take into consideration the weight of the pack itself (which must be deducted from the total load) and its volume so that you wind up with a bug out backpack that can carry the appropriate amount of supplies.
Astronauts are provided with survival kits due to the difficulty of predicting where a spacecraft will land on its return to earth, especially in the case of an equipment failure. In early US space flights, the kit was optimised for survival at sea; the one provided for John Glenn on the first American space flight in Friendship 7 contained "a life raft, pocket knife, signaling mirror, shark repellent, seawater desalting tablets, sunscreen, soap, first aid kit, and other items".[5] A survival kit was provided for the Apollo program which was "...designed to provide a 48-hour postlanding (water or land) survival capability for three crewmen between 40 degrees North and South latitudes".[6] It contained "a survival radio, a survival light assembly, desalter kits, a machete, sunglasses, water cans, sun lotion, a blanket, a pocket knife, netting and foam pads".[7]
There’s always going to be the debate of Bugging In v. Bugging Out, and that is really our job as readers and posters to decide which is best for us and determine the situations/scenarios we may be faced with. What degree of societal collapse do we need to see, before we get the heck out of town? Obviously, the more rural your location is, the higher the probability of staying in place will be. One’s health, general level of physical conditioning and age are all factors we need to consider. It’s easy to say “Get into shape,” but the reality is that may not be possible for some of us with long standing health problems. For those of us incapable of increasing our strength or endurance, Bugging Out may be our last option.

A bit off topic here, but if you’re new to prepping, survival foods is only the first step to a thorough plan for surviving a catastrophic disaster, with the greatest risk being to those who live in or near major cities. If there is ever a disruption in the food supply, major cities will suffer the hardest and first due to the insanely high number of people who need food and water (into the millions in certain cities).
Wise includes a variety of tasty meal options, with familiar favorites like stroganoff and alfredo pasta alongside interesting options like tortilla soup and brown sugar and maple multi-grain cereal. It’s worth noting that if you’re shopping for gluten-free or only organic emergency food supplies, Wise makes these specialty buckets available as well.
One thing that the article doesn’t reference is “How many people will there be in your Bug Out party?” The point being, that although there are some items that need to be in everyones B.O.B, there are others that don’t require duplication. Figuring out which items can be used by all the members of your party can reduce duplicating these items in each bag. For example, does everyone in your party need to carry a 1 quart backpacking pot, or will 1 or 2 suffice for your whole group? Those types of items can then be parceled out to the members of the group, and cut the weight down.

Make sure your emergency kit is stocked with the items on the checklist below. Most of the items are inexpensive and easy to find, and any one of them could save your life. Headed to the store? Download a printable version to take with you. Once you take a look at the basic items, consider what unique needs your family might have, such as supplies for pets, or seniors.


All Valley Food Storage emergency food supplies are produced without the use of GMO ingredients, fillers, and MSG. One unique feature is Valley Food’s Kid Favorites selections, which includes yummy-sounding options like Mac and Cheese, Cheddar Potato Soup, and an abundance of freeze-dried fruits along with other nutritious options. If you’re building an emergency food supply for kids, it makes sense to add some of these trusty staples to your supply. 
The Stealth Tactical bug out bag assumes that you have not been able to make it to a shelter and will need to fend for yourself in the outdoors. As such there’s plenty of tactical gear to keep you moving, keep you dry, keep you hydrated and keep you safe. That includes a dozen packets of purified water, rain ponchos, emergency sleeping bags, a fire starting kit, survival knife, foldable saw, emergency whistle, first aid kit, paracord, multi tool, candles and even a stethoscope so you can monitor your health.

Remember that this pack should be prepared and stored somewhere easily accessible and rodent proof. It is also a good idea to review the contents of your pack every 6 months to ensure you have appropriate clothes packed for the season and that your gear and rations are in order. This will help you feel confident that your Bug Out Bag is ready to go at a moment’s notice!
MOLLE organization systems are a great added feature for a BOB. MOLLE webbing is straps built into the outside of your pack that allows for additional gear and even other packs to be attached externally. If you have a sturdy pack with MOLLE webbing and carabiners, you can add a lot more gear on the outside of the pack that you otherwise might not have been able to pack inside your BOB.
The communications equipment may include a multi-band receiver/scanner, a citizens band (CB) radio, portable "walkie-talkies" with rechargeable batteries, and a portable battery-powered television. The power supplies may include a diesel or gasoline generator with a one-month fuel supply, an auto battery and charger, extension cord, flashlights, rechargeable batteries (with recharger), an electric multi meter, and a test light. Defense items include a revolver, semi-automatic pistol, rifle, shotgun, ammunition, mace or pepper spray, and a large knife such as a KA-BAR or a bowie knife.
Canned food is heavy and not portable – which means that if push comes to shove, it will be difficult to travel with a large amount of it. Canned food should be a part of your survival food plan though — it can be the food that helps you get by the first few weeks, as long as you don’t have to evacuate or travel (particularly on foot). If you have canned food, you should also have a survival multi tool with you (rather than a can opener). A can opener is a single use tool – and generally you want to avoid those.

The term "survival kit" may also refer to the larger, portable survival kits prepared by survivalists, called "bug-out bags" (BOBs), "Personal Emergency Relocation Kits" (PERKs) or "get out of Dodge" (GOOD) kits, which are packed into backpacks, or even duffel bags. These kits are designed specifically to be more easily carried by the individual in case alternate forms of transportation are unavailable or impossible to use.


I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
It is really important to know what all you actually need to prepare yourself and your family for an emergency. The first and foremost thing is the first aid kit. It is really important to store your firstaid supplies in a sturdy box or nylon case. But the point to remember is that, the case should be easy to carry and water proof. It is better to keep all the important medicines in your case and also make sure they are not expired.
Keep in mind, a well-designed bug out bag should weigh no more than 25% of your body weight, assuming you are in average physical condition and are not overweight. Any heavier than that can make carrying the bag highly strenuous and limit your ability to remain mobile and travel long distances on foot during an evacuation. Limit your packing list to the essentials that will help you survive.
• Long term Food Storage: Mountain House freeze dried long term food that has a shelf life of around 30 years if stored in a cool dark place. Survival Cave offers pre-cooked canned meats for the best tasting survival food on the market today. Wise Foods offers freeze dried food at a lower price point. Wise freeze dried food is about 25% less than Mountain House freeze dried food. But, I personally store Mountain House foods due to the great taste. Along with long term food storage you should have some survival camping gear, emergency essentials, disaster preparedness food and energy bars.The best advantage of long term food storage is that you can get these foods in bigger units an at more affordable prices.

For someone new to being a Survivalist building your first Bug Out Bag can seem like a big task. Everybody you read about has been tweaking theirs for months or even years and has a pile of gear built up. It’s hard to know where to start, but if you cover all of the basics in a survival situation you will still be much better off that 99% of the people.

In arctic or alpine areas, survival kits may have additional cold weather clothing (winter hats and gloves), sleeping bags, chemical "hand warmer" packets, sun glasses/snow goggles, snowshoes, a collapsible shovel, a snare wire for small animals, a frying pan, a camp stove, camp stove fuel, a space blanket, matches, a whistle, a compass, tinder, medical equipment, a flint strike, a wire saw, extra socks and a tent designed for arctic use.
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