There is a delicate balance between exploring and surviving, and every aspect of gameplay is closely related. The amount of activity the player performs and the distance they can travel and explore, are balanced around certain metrics such as time, warmth, and calories - and all of these game systems are closely related resulting in a finely tuned experience. For example, eating food replenishes calories, but in order to find food, you have to explore and salvage which causes you to burn calories in the first place. The player must watch how many calories they burn, even when sleeping, and make sure they find or hunt enough food to keep themselves going. On top of this, the player needs to seek shelter from the cold, make sure they are wearing the appropriate clothing, and build fires to stay warm and cook food. During your explorations to salvage supplies and look for food items, you will need to explore carefully as to not get stuck without a place to sleep for the night. See More
William, me and my husband are in our late 50’s, and we live in a rural area too, with lots of trees, with few people around. I, myself have read many survival books, (audio too), and websites, and have signed up for so many survival website newsletters, it’s ridiculous! Anyway, I’ve learned very much from them, over the many years, and if I haven’t learned anything, I’ve at least learned that you need other people, a small community to survive. I would love to talk more to you and your wife about your plans, and other things pertaining to survival, and about our religion. Would you mind chatting with me, about them? I’m joanofark06 (zero six) on a website (short registration), called wireclub dot com. Just put my name in the search for people. I’d love to hear more about your views on this subject.
Some additional items that you should look for in a quality bug out bag include a hydration tube and bladder compatibility (although you’ll usually have to buy these separately), hip belt pockets (where you can store items you want quick access to), and at least one large compartment (where you can fit bulkier items like a tarp, sleeping bag, or large clothing).

I too live in a remote Alaskan location. I am facing the same dilema with the livestock concern. Heating a building year round just to keep your chickens alive sure does not seem appealing. I would however, recommend you getting fishing nets to catch “bulk” fish in the summer and since you have solar panels, and an extra freezer to store the fish in to get through the winter. I also have an ice auger and tip ups for winter time fishing. As far as medical kits, I have an extensive one to say the least. It contains everything needed to perform any type of minor surgery and some major surgery operations. Sutures, staple kits, scapels and TONS of gauze and pain medication!! Also dental kits and means to repair broken caps or teeth. Good luck to you, sounds as if you are doing very well in your setup =)
When calamity strikes you’ll still need to eat and if there are no shelters in the vicinity stocked with emergency supplies what are you supposed to do? The answer is the Food Insurance bug out bag that provides you with copious amounts of prepared food sealed in vacuum pouches and ready to be eaten. Every Food Insurance meal has a shelf life of more than a decade and requires only a bit of water to prepare. Everything from lasagna to omelets to rice and beans are here along with the stove to cook them. Add some of your own survival gear like a tactical flashlight, survival knife, emergency blankets and water filter and you’re ready for whatever comes down the pike.
You prepare everyday. When you were young you learned to tie your shoes, put your own clothes on etc etc etc. Now you are older and it is time to re learn those same SELF reliance skills. What good are you to others if you are amongst the masses of unprepared. How can you possibly help your fellow man if you are not ready yourself? I say it makes you MORE christian. By the way there were plenty of christians that lived in the dark ages. Just be aware and keep your eyes open.

The Stealth Tactical bug out bag assumes that you have not been able to make it to a shelter and will need to fend for yourself in the outdoors. As such there’s plenty of tactical gear to keep you moving, keep you dry, keep you hydrated and keep you safe. That includes a dozen packets of purified water, rain ponchos, emergency sleeping bags, a fire starting kit, survival knife, foldable saw, emergency whistle, first aid kit, paracord, multi tool, candles and even a stethoscope so you can monitor your health.

The game features a massive, open-world sandbox mode in which there are no quests to gate your progress, or artificial boundaries to exploration. The only goal is to survive as long as possible, and to do it by whatever means possible. This free-exploration, open-world design offers plenty of space to roam for those who want to enjoy a more open playstyle without the hindrances of time gates or quest mechanics. Whether you choose to salvage for supplies, hunt the local wildlife, start cooking fires, or simply just take in the view - the freedom to explore and interact with the world in your own way is endless. See More
When calamity strikes you’ll still need to eat and if there are no shelters in the vicinity stocked with emergency supplies what are you supposed to do? The answer is the Food Insurance bug out bag that provides you with copious amounts of prepared food sealed in vacuum pouches and ready to be eaten. Every Food Insurance meal has a shelf life of more than a decade and requires only a bit of water to prepare. Everything from lasagna to omelets to rice and beans are here along with the stove to cook them. Add some of your own survival gear like a tactical flashlight, survival knife, emergency blankets and water filter and you’re ready for whatever comes down the pike.
Additionallly, I’ve added a number of firearms, including a handgun, an AR 15 with optics and  at least 900 rounds for each. I also have an older 30-06 with a scope for which I have a bit of ammo. I’ve practiced with each of these weapons to tha point where I’m proficient. I’m no sniper, but can definitely hit < 4" groups with the handgun at appropriate distances and better groups with the battle rifle and the '06 at 100 yds.
While there are many servers where the traditional shoot-on-sight mentality exists, Rust has plenty of havens for those looking for a more civilised lifestyle. You can find player-created towns, complete with attempts at government, trading, and even prisons. It’s one of the nicest reminders that if people pull together and share their resources, fantastic achievements can be made.
SHTF is an acronym that stands for sh*t hits the fan. This means that something drastic has happened, like a natural disaster, financial crisis, or a war has started. This term is generally used for when things go south quickly. The other acronym that is commonly used to signal it is time to pull out your bug out bag is ‘TEOTWAWKI’. This stands for ‘the end of the world as we know it’.
However, I do have a medical background (combat medic, EMT, surgical nurse). My suggestion to you would be to learn basic first aid, and assemble an advanced first aid kit (try some websites that cater to military, and look for CLS training books and med kits). While I think that it admirable that people want to have surgical kits and such, they are not really useful (quite the opposite actually) if you do not know how to use them. So I would recommend getting a trusted friend with advanced medical skills to come live with you in the event of a catastrophe. Make your site their bug-out location, and assign them the responsibility of preparing advanced medical supplies.
At your level (living in an unsecured structure) it will be hard to prep beyond a short period of nutritional survival. Remember, anything you have will immeadiately be sought after by those whom have not prepped, i.e. food, water and weapons. Without a fortified structure to hold out in during periods of unrest protecting items you have prepped with will be significantly difficult on your own. What I am saying is you need to find another prepping group or family you can join in times of discord. Anything lasting beyond a week and people will become like animals to survive-sad, but true. This may sound difficult but it is better to hear the truth and figure out a plan than to have someone tell you to get a weeks worth of water and food and sit in your trailer which all in all would only make you a target for non preppers in a week plus survival scenario. If we experience a slight buckle in society (something which would only last a few days) it would of course behoove you to have water and food for a week stored. It would also be a good idea to buy a handgun and go to the shooting range and take some classes. Lastly, dont tell anyone what you are doing whom is not a prepper. Your a lone female and you are in a difficult position to prep, the less people who know you have supplies, the better. If you wish to have more info on prepping, building a structure-(this can be done for less than 20K if you have land somewhere), finding supplies or the best weapons for yourself plese write me at artofmal@aol.com Id be happy to assist with any and all information. Best Regards and good luck!

The most important factor that will determine the right size bug out bag is your torso size. You can measure your torso by having a friend or casual acquaintance measure the distance from the top of your Iliac Crest (hip bones) up to the bony prominence at the base of your neck (the last cervical vertebrae). Knowing the length of your torso will help you choose a bug out bag that fits comfortably.


Terraria has all kinds of tools and materials you can use to build whatever you can imagine. From housing, to furniture, to weapons, to types of structure, the possibilities are almost endless. This is great for children who enjoy building and problem solving, and for adults who enjoy the same. It also makes for a great objective-less game, where you can do just about anything you want at your own pace. See More

The Bug Out vs. Bug In is something I wish I would have read about earlier in my prepping. I made the assumption getting out was the only option. The reality is though, I’m nearly 60 and disabled from Degenerative Joint Disease, therefore, Bugging Out is the last option I should choose. The list of potential factors to help you determine BO vs. BI are many and the list seems to grow daily. What size community is the line in the sand in determining it’s best to leave? What is the SHTF event(s)? And 100’s of other questions and potential scenarios that could play out.
Once you’ve gotten some idea of what you need to do and how to do it, you really need to sit down and make an overall plan. This is kind of like making an outline for a book or story. This is where you’ll list any plans you have or things you still need to do in general terms. You should be continually updating this overall emergency plan. It should be in one place (or exact copies) that anyone in the family will know where it is to grab. I’d keep it in a binder at the house and some kind of copy in your bug out bag. Digital backups are always a good idea but don’t make it your only method.
It doesn’t matter if you’re preparing for natural disasters, or man made disasters, or other SHTF societal collapse type scenarios. It doesn’t matter which kinds of survival skills you decide to focus on or what kind of prepping you end up doing. What matters the most is the simple understanding that the world can change in an instant, and that we should be ready if and when that happens. That doesn’t mean you need to worry and stress about the potential end of the world – in fact, becoming a prepper should help you sleep easier at night, because you’ll know that if a world ending disaster were to happen, your chances of making it through are much, much higher than the average person.
MOLLE organization systems are a great added feature for a BOB. MOLLE webbing is straps built into the outside of your pack that allows for additional gear and even other packs to be attached externally. If you have a sturdy pack with MOLLE webbing and carabiners, you can add a lot more gear on the outside of the pack that you otherwise might not have been able to pack inside your BOB.

MOLLE organization systems are a great added feature for a BOB. MOLLE webbing is straps built into the outside of your pack that allows for additional gear and even other packs to be attached externally. If you have a sturdy pack with MOLLE webbing and carabiners, you can add a lot more gear on the outside of the pack that you otherwise might not have been able to pack inside your BOB.
Watch “The Walking Dead” and “The Day After.” The greatest threat will be “normal” citizens who will respond to the Reptilian Portion of their brain, and ethics are out the window. It will be kill or be killed. You’d better be prepared to do things; like kill women and maybe even children, if things get really bad. It’s not going to be “fun camping trip.”
The Emergency Zone bug out bag is one of the best equipped you’ll find with everything from the expected like drinking water and flashlight to the unexpected like works, a tube tent, toilet paper and even a multi tool. What it’s light on is food but there’s plenty of room in the water resistant bag for 4 or 5 days of food or more. While the shoulder straps on the Emergency Zone backpack could use some more padding the rest of the pack is logistically sound with plenty of external pockets for the included gear plus your own compass, GPS device, tactical flashlight, maps and more.

I too live in a remote Alaskan location. I am facing the same dilema with the livestock concern. Heating a building year round just to keep your chickens alive sure does not seem appealing. I would however, recommend you getting fishing nets to catch “bulk” fish in the summer and since you have solar panels, and an extra freezer to store the fish in to get through the winter. I also have an ice auger and tip ups for winter time fishing. As far as medical kits, I have an extensive one to say the least. It contains everything needed to perform any type of minor surgery and some major surgery operations. Sutures, staple kits, scapels and TONS of gauze and pain medication!! Also dental kits and means to repair broken caps or teeth. Good luck to you, sounds as if you are doing very well in your setup =)
William, me and my husband are in our late 50’s, and we live in a rural area too, with lots of trees, with few people around. I, myself have read many survival books, (audio too), and websites, and have signed up for so many survival website newsletters, it’s ridiculous! Anyway, I’ve learned very much from them, over the many years, and if I haven’t learned anything, I’ve at least learned that you need other people, a small community to survive. I would love to talk more to you and your wife about your plans, and other things pertaining to survival, and about our religion. Would you mind chatting with me, about them? I’m joanofark06 (zero six) on a website (short registration), called wireclub dot com. Just put my name in the search for people. I’d love to hear more about your views on this subject.
If you’re after the best crafting survival game out there, look no further than Minecraft. At some point, it seems someone decided survival was all about gruelling punishment, sloth-like progression, and murdering anyone who isn’t you. But before the big survival blow-out on Steam we had Minecraft: a fun, colourful, creative survival sandbox. Sure, there are zombies that will eat your face, and spiders, skeletons and dragons, but with Minecraft skins, you at least always end up blocky and cute. No one minds a cartoon monster having you for breakfast.
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