While the idea of being properly prepared for some kind of large scale crisis may seem strange to ordinary people, for those of us who’re more aware of the wider world and what’s going on in it, it seems like an obvious thing to do. It’s entirely possible that the world will keep on as normal, in which case those of us who’re well prepared will have wasted a little money and a little time on making preparations for a disaster that doesn’t happen.

Size – Everyone overestimates how much they’re carrying when they go backpacking (if everyone who claimed to carry a 100 pound pack actually did we’d have thousands of hiker deaths every year in the US alone). But a survival situation is one time when you need to be cold-light-of-day honest about how much you can carry and what that load should be comprised of to give you the best possible chance of survival. As a general rule you shouldn’t carry more than 15 or 20% of your body weight, which for most people will be between 20 and 40 pounds. With this in mind you’ll want to take into consideration the weight of the pack itself (which must be deducted from the total load) and its volume so that you wind up with a bug out backpack that can carry the appropriate amount of supplies.
For cooking I've got multiple options: I have the Rocket stove which uses any biomass, ie wood, sticks, dried blackberry brambles, pine cones, you name it, it will prolly burn it. I might have to try dried cow patties, I'll bet they'd work too. I have a 3 burner propane stove and a number of portable tanks that would last a few weeksmaybe a month. My latest purchase was a package of kerosene burning appliances, including three different stoves, a high pressure lantern, hurricane lamps, wind-up radio and lights too. Check it out at St Paul Merchantile. Mine should arrive tomorrow. I'm looking forward to trying it out. So, I will set aside about 30 gallons of kerosene for now, but may end up putting in a large below ground tank for longterm storage. 
im new to this prepping but the one thing i do that most have said not to do is i store water with a few drops of bleach in old milk jugs not for drinking but for bathing or flushing the toilet heating up to bath an i store it downstairs away from fresh water or food another prep i found was collecting old wine bottles from neighbors or family washing them and drying them well then storing my rice and beans in them with oxygen packets the bottles are free and usually dark so that helps to keep out the sun light hope these ideas help some thanks for you great post
Did you know that most people in the United States have less than 2 weeks of food stored in their home?!  If this includes you, it’s time to make a change!  Take a look at your food supplies and estimate how long you could survive on it – for most beginners it’s pretty scary!   Your first goal with food should be to have 1 month worth of meals stored, immediately after that you’re going to get 3 months worth as quickly as possible.  Here is a great place to learn about storing your own food.  Some additional fantastic resources for Food Storage are Everyday Food Storage and Food Storage Made Easy.
There are many choices of packs out there that would make a good Bug Out Bag. In the end, the important thing to keep in mind is your personal preference. Bigger doesn’t always mean better when it comes to selecting the right bug out bag. Remember that a Bug Out Bag is recommended to store 3 days worth of rations, water, and gear in a survival situation.
So many worried about not being Christian like in prepping. My father is poor and prefers it, however if a disaster happened I would go to him lol. You will be surprised to learn how many poor and homeless are more prepared than most of us. That being said you can always start or join a co op, or start your own group that saves extra so when all our preppjng is finally needed we can help out others. Sadly it will be more like two movies…. the book of Eli and cant remember name but about the end of. Humanity after a comet strike or nun war. Sorry don’t remember name.
Stick with it (and also grab a few friends) and DayZ begins to slowly flourish, however. DayZ as a whole is something of a slow game with human encounters being few and far between, as well as there being a likelihood that they may just kill you outright. It was in Early Access for an obscene and controversial length of time, though its 1.0 update wasn’t without its problems, either.
There’s always going to be the debate of Bugging In v. Bugging Out, and that is really our job as readers and posters to decide which is best for us and determine the situations/scenarios we may be faced with. What degree of societal collapse do we need to see, before we get the heck out of town? Obviously, the more rural your location is, the higher the probability of staying in place will be. One’s health, general level of physical conditioning and age are all factors we need to consider. It’s easy to say “Get into shape,” but the reality is that may not be possible for some of us with long standing health problems. For those of us incapable of increasing our strength or endurance, Bugging Out may be our last option.

What normal people do is go on with their lives and ignore what will happen. It is not a matter of IF but of WHEN. And WHEN it happens, they go batshit crazy and freak out and their whole world collapses. They regard preppers as crazy people, but yet when emergency strikes come knocking on their doors, even using violence to steal what they built up in their cleverness.

Before we get started, if you just want a list of everything you need to have on hand to be ready for a disaster or emergency situation, here’s our full list of essential emergency supplies to survive any disaster. If you’ve acquired everything on that list, it’s fair to say that you’re officially a prepper, and that you’re ready for most survival scenarios.

My father is poor and prefers it that way. He was homeless by choice for many years. He is more prepped than the average person. His servival skills are amazing and he has taught me a lot. So don’t think all poor people are not prepared for this, many are. If you are worried about poor people though you can always join a co-op, start your own group, or just keep extra around just in case.

MOLLE organization systems are a great added feature for a BOB. MOLLE webbing is straps built into the outside of your pack that allows for additional gear and even other packs to be attached externally. If you have a sturdy pack with MOLLE webbing and carabiners, you can add a lot more gear on the outside of the pack that you otherwise might not have been able to pack inside your BOB.
Terraria uses a bright color palette and an upbeat chiptune soundtrack to ease you into its world. However, once you start exploring and spend time in it you'll notice it's not as cozy as it first seemed to be. Blood Moons that rouse the dead from their graves. Goblin armies trying to destroy everything in their wake. Vast and dark cave systems, filled with odd creatures and various dangers. Ancient ruins, teeming with the restless dead and evil spirits. Pockets of decaying land, thriving with misshapen monstrosities. It's really fun to explore and discover something new about the world of Terraria. See More

Design – The best bug out bag is one with plenty of pockets. This allows you to compartmentalize your bug out bag essentials so that you know exactly where everything is and you don’t have to dig through mountains of other stuff to find what you need. Put all your fire and light things together such as tactical flashlight, candles, headlamp, fire starting kit and storm proof matches. Put maps, GPS devices, compass and other navigation related items in their own pocket and so on. The more you can separate things the easier it will be to transcend your difficulties.
Finally, we arrive at food. Basic food stockpiling is pretty straightforward – look for non-perishable food items that are nutritious, buy them in bulk, and store them in cool, dry, dark places. If you’re not sure what to buy, we have a very in depth article on the best survival foods that’s actually one of the most popular articles on this site – make sure you check that out if you’re not sure where to begin. Food stockpiling is easy – make sure you buy the right things, store them in the right way, and cycle them roughly once a year and you’ll be able to feed your family through long periods of survival conditions.
Plastic is a tricky thing. Clear hard plastic jugs like from companies like…Crystal Geyser, Alhambra etc. Are better for storing water in as far as plastic goes. The foggy white “milk Jug” style will break down fast and sadly leak in your cupboards. IF that is all you can get, I suggest storing in the garage or a place with good flooring and maybe even put into garbage bag in case.
Great read & outstanding list of items. Extremely helpful & very much appreciated. While I’ve found over the decades that there are usually several ways to accomplish most things, focusing on the core items/goal while adapting to the situations & environment an individual(s) find themselves in is crucial. You can have everything known to man & still have limited skills/experience leaving you vulnerable. You can have all the skills but arrogance & overconfidence can do you in. Applicable intelligence, balance in actions/approach to problem solving on the fly & practice with skills/preps can make the difference in most cases. So one has a 35 year supply of beans and rice, great to have no doubt, but who wouldn’t trade some of it for a coke and some M&Ms for normalcy occasionally? That may be just enough encouragement to get the companions/family through to safety. Again, it’s all a wag for the most part…do what preps you can, develop usable skills…plan, persevere & prevail. Fantastic prep checklist & ideas…thanks! Proverbs 27-17…As iron sharpens iron, so on man sharpens another!
I would like to address the question about being a Christian and prepping. The final book in the bible describes the “End of Days”, it tells of the hardships to come. It tells of a time when a days pay will net you only a loaf of bread. I am a parent with 3 teenagers and I can tell you, one loaf of bread with not feed us. The bible also tells us that in that time you will not be able to buy or sell unless you have the mark of the beast which would damn your soul. I think that a really good book in the Bible that supports being prepared for what is to come is Proverbs. My own belief, is that one is responsible for ones self and to provide for their family no matter what comes. We are to be pillars of strength in our society and a moral compass. When whatever comes, I think you’ll find God and good fortune smile on the prepared. God Bless.
Getting together a group of friends to play Don't Starve Together adds a lot of enjoyment to the game. If you're all first timers, learning how to survive as you go along is amazing, since you get to share in the learning process and the experience together. As you craft and build your own forts, farms, and more, you find more and more ways to learn how to survive, making things less daunting than if you play the game alone. See More

In 7DTD players don't build their homes only as bases or places to sleep in, or build cool looking things just for the fun of it and to test their skills. Every 7 days, a large horde of zombies will attack the player wherever he or she is, trying to destroy them and what stands in the way of the player and the horde. This is why the player needs to think about how to build traps that will help them kill a lot of zombies and how to make a strong enough house that will not be destroyed easily. See More
The game’s survival elements include the food and water requirements that most games in the genre do, but there’s obviously a more pressing issue in Subnautica: oxygen. You can’t breathe sea water, so your oxygen levels and consumption have to be on your mind at all times. Seeing as you’re continually threatened with the prospect of drowning, you really should read our Subnautica guide to ensure you squeeze every last drop out of your diver’s life. Every survival game has the ominous shadow following you around, but here it’s simply good old O2.
What about natural disasters, like hurricanes, or earthquakes, or floods? Surely we’ve all noticed the increase in large scale natural disasters that we’ve been experiencing. How about the possibility of a global pandemic similar to the Spanish Flu (which killed 50 million people, one third of the world’s population at the time). In a Spanish Flu scenario, more than 2 billion people could die – what kind of impact would this have on our normal lives, on the economy and society as a whole? Scientists are increasingly worried about these so-called super viruses and anti-biotic resistant bacteria that are highly resistant to treatment. All it takes is one of these diseases to become both highly resistant and highly infectious/contagious and we could be talking about a death toll not in the millions, but in the billions. In this situation, would we still have electricity? Would stores stay open? Would the food supply that we’ve come to rely on still function the same? Nobody can truly answer these kinds of questions, and that’s why prepping is important.

Another issue with Bugging Out in the Rocky Mountain States is water. The actual number of rivers and streams originating in the Rockies is smaller than most people realize in relation to other areas of the country. Many streams and creeks are seasonal drainage and not year round. Although the options for alternate water sources are all viable, most consist of a daily collection of H2O that require time and effort that will affect the other daily survival requirements.
Once you’ve got basic stockpiles and plans for meeting all of your basic survival needs, you can move on to skill acquisition. This is where you go from the basics to becoming a certain “type” of prepper. We’ve already gone over some of the skills relevant to shelters, food, and water, but there are a huge variety of useful skills and knowledge that you can pick up that might come in handy in a true disaster scenario. Make sure you check out our survival skills section – pick and choose the things that interest you the most.
Terraria is a sandbox platform-adventure game, so it partly hinges on beating various bosses. If you play it purely for the sake of defeating all the bosses, you might have little else to do afterwards. Restarting the game won't be as enjoyable either because you'll already know what to expect, causing continued play without a new goal feel mundane or boring. See More
im new to this prepping but the one thing i do that most have said not to do is i store water with a few drops of bleach in old milk jugs not for drinking but for bathing or flushing the toilet heating up to bath an i store it downstairs away from fresh water or food another prep i found was collecting old wine bottles from neighbors or family washing them and drying them well then storing my rice and beans in them with oxygen packets the bottles are free and usually dark so that helps to keep out the sun light hope these ideas help some thanks for you great post
The list of possible areas of interest and the related skills that you can pick up are endless, and almost all of them could prove useful. Being a prepping doesn’t just mean having a huge stockpile off food in your basement – it can be a lot more than that, and go in almost any direction you like. Essentially, if your hobbies or interests could prove useful in a disaster situation, then you can apply that to your prepping by simply changing your frame of mind – instead of purely thinking about something as ‘I’m doing this for fun”, think about it also as ‘I’m doing this to arm myself with a new and useful survival skill”
My husband and I have just started prepping and I can’t read enough information on what we should be doing to prepare. Our biggest questions seem to be about where to find a safe place to go. We live in Ohio right now but plan on moving to Tennessee (Cumberland area) in 3 years. I’ve read a little about the area but I’m not really convinced this is a safe area to stay. Anyone’s thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!

The first thing to do to ensure that you have access to clean water is to stockpile it. An average person needs about a half gallon a day of drinking water, so for a family of four, you need 2 gallons of water a day. FEMA recommends that you store up to three days worth of water to deal with shortages and such, but as preppers, we’re planning for scenarios that go beyond the typical natural disasters you see. We recommend having a stockpile of at least 2 weeks worth of water, which means you should have about 28 gallons of water stored at any given time.


Tom,Great Post!Lisa, I have been reading your blog and lieavng on the screen for my wife to absorb. You did a great job in the interview!! You are always so pleasant with your replies to everyone on your blog as well! There are are so many good resources on the innertubes…….APN, The Survival Mom, Survival Blog, The Survivalist Blog…..all with unique viewpoints. We are blessed to have such strong and valuable viewpoints!MNAZ
GraywolfSurvival.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to (Amazon.com, or endless.com, MYHABIT.com, SmallParts.com, or AmazonWireless.com. All reviews and information are independent and objective.

We also need to figure out what kind of survival equipment we need that will make it easier for us to replenish our needs. As an example of this – we need water to survive. But no matter how much clean drinking water you store up, you’ll run out of it at some point. So we need to figure out what kind of gear we need to purify or distill our own water.
What I will do is recommend that you build your own First Aid Kit instead of buying one of those prepackaged first aid kits that claim to have 1001 things to get you through any emergency. While some are ok, in my experience these types of kits are usually filled with a lot of stuff you are unlikely to need and not enough of the things you will probably need a lot of.
Terraria uses a bright color palette and an upbeat chiptune soundtrack to ease you into its world. However, once you start exploring and spend time in it you'll notice it's not as cozy as it first seemed to be. Blood Moons that rouse the dead from their graves. Goblin armies trying to destroy everything in their wake. Vast and dark cave systems, filled with odd creatures and various dangers. Ancient ruins, teeming with the restless dead and evil spirits. Pockets of decaying land, thriving with misshapen monstrosities. It's really fun to explore and discover something new about the world of Terraria. See More
So despite the impression many people got from my “50 Items” article, I don’t think you should pack your bug out bag with as many items as possible. In fact, I think you should check your bag for any non-essential items with a large weight-to-space ratio and remove them. To that end, here’s a list of survival items I’ve seen in various lists online that, in my opinion, you don’t really need in your bug out bag.
Regardless of your skill level, you will be able to find a difficulty level that suits you and satisfies your craving for a good challenge. This game features four different difficulty levels, making it accessible to a broad range of players. The easiest mode is Pilgrim and it offers a gaming experience suitable to all players where dying is a rare occurrence. For beginning players, Voyager is recommended as it gives you a forgivable way to learn the basics. After that, the difficulty takes a strong curve upwards into the remaining two modes: Stalker, and Interloper - with the latter being considered a very challenging gaming experience only recommended for expert gamers and those who desire a true video game survival challenge. See More
A BOB is the minimum equipment you need (depending on your skill set) to get from point A to point B. It is not meant to last a month or a year or ten years. If you don’t have long term gear at point B and you can’t stay at point A, you’re better off in a FEMA camp. Point B can be anything from a motel to a relative’s house to a cabin deep in the woods someplace but you have to get there when the going gets tough. That’s why a BOB is important. What I think people fail to understand is that what takes 72 hours in good times might take two weeks or more in tough times and that BOB needs to get you through. Hunting, fishing, trapping and foraging are required skills in that case; you can’t rely solely on what you can carry on your back.
The long and the short of it is that the world is in more danger that it seems. Everything that we see as ‘normal’ could be wiped out of existence at any time – or we could go another 200 years without seeing the type of disaster that we’re prepping for. However, the risk always exist, and preppers are just people who recognize that risk and have made appropriate preparations to protect their homes and their families in case a large scale disaster ever actually happens.
(Edit: The game actually does have an endless mode with various different maps to chose from.) Frostpunk's main scenario only runs about 45 in-game days (6-12 hours). There is no sandbox mode where you can keep growing and building indefinitely, making it a rather limited simulation experience overall. This may be disappointing to those who would prefer to keep their city going as long as possible. See More
Prepping is getting more mainstream today and there is a lot of information out there now about getting ready for an emergency or in case SHTF, but if you’re new to being a prepper, what should you do first? You need to know how to start prepping. If you’re one of my regular readers, you may be a bit more advanced when it comes to prepping because my typical articles have been for more thorough research. It’s time I start balancing things and have  some articles that have a bit more reach and are more useful to the 99% of people out there looking to prepare their families for emergencies or in case SHTF or even prepping for doomsday.
You can enact and carry out laws in your city that will affect both the survival and happiness of your citizens in interesting ways. These moral choices add an entertaining and engaging depth to gameplay. For example, if your workers are frostbitten, you can house them in hospitals which costs resources. Otherwise, you can choose to amputate them which effectively takes them out of your workforce, yet they still have to be housed, kept warm, and fed. Children can be kept protected and warm, or you can send them off in the frozen wasteland to work like the adults. Every single action you take affects how content or upset your population is. Whether you keep them safe and warm, or make tough calls in the name of survival is your choice. These systems must be carefully balanced if you want to succeed. All in all, Frostpunk offers no shortage of interesting moral choices for you to make. See More

Every bug out bag should be 100% unique. Sure, there are some basic items that every bug out bag should have (food, lighter, water filter, flashlight, etc.), but you should customize your bag based on where you live, what type of disaster is most likely to occur in your area, and how much weight you can carry over a long distance. Many preppers forget about that last point.
So despite the impression many people got from my “50 Items” article, I don’t think you should pack your bug out bag with as many items as possible. In fact, I think you should check your bag for any non-essential items with a large weight-to-space ratio and remove them. To that end, here’s a list of survival items I’ve seen in various lists online that, in my opinion, you don’t really need in your bug out bag.
I found your post to be very thoughtful to be concerned about the poor. I rely heavily on ‘prepping’ ideas and ‘how to’ from those ‘without’. They are survivors that know how to do more with less. These folks are labeled as ‘poor’ because they do not have $$$, I would suggest that many ‘poor’ have a ‘wealth’ of knowledge to survive in such situations.
Completely blown away by amazing graphics, great sound effects and an eargasm level of music. The environment is harsh, your decisions even harsher. Everything you do affects the outcome of the game, and beating the main story took me quite a few attempts. Endless mode invites for trying out different strategies, and the achievements give nice ideas for different approach on the main story. See More

You will be able to prep only at the basic level (to withstand about a week or so of unrest, Im speaking of civil unrest. Any type of chemical or nuclear attack and it is very unlikely you will not survive in an apt structure) You need two weeks of food and water–long term food storage items, not items from the local grocery store. You also should purchase a gun for each of you and take some shooting classes at the shooting range. Lastly, You need to stock up on any perscription medications you take on a regular basis, you can accomplish this by ‘losing’ a perscription every now and then and having the pharmacist replace it. You should have no less than 6 months of perscriptions even if you only have limited food and water–it can also be used to bargain with later. Best of luck to you.
When loaded and put on properly, your hips should carry the bulk of your pack’s weight. Because of this, extra padding in the hip belt can make a lot of difference. However, you should also make sure the hip belt isn’t so bulky that it ends up rubbing your hip bones or ribs uncomfortably. In an ideal world, your bug out bag’s hip belt should fit comfortably between the top of your hip bones and the bottom of your lowest ribs. 
My father is poor and prefers it that way. He was homeless by choice for many years. He is more prepped than the average person. His servival skills are amazing and he has taught me a lot. So don’t think all poor people are not prepared for this, many are. If you are worried about poor people though you can always join a co-op, start your own group, or just keep extra around just in case.
I noticed that a reliable light weight firearm was on the list. While many may think it uselss, a good high powered barrel break pellet rifle can do almost as much as a 22 rifle. A hundred dollars will get you one at Walmart that you can switch from .177 caliber to 22 caliber. The rifle breaks down and is easily carried inside of a decent back pack. The weight of the ammo is significantly lighter as well. This can be used to take down most birds, squirls, rabbits, small pigs and even foxes as well as racoons, armadillo’s. And snakes. All sources of protein.
Here’s another bug out bag that’s designed to help you survive in the out of doors for several days following a natural or man-made calamity. As you might expect from a company call “Ultimate Arms” this particular bug out bag is heavy on the armaments including an EDC knife, a large survival knife, a tomahawk and a full sized machete. Oh yeah, there’s also a pick axe and plenty of bandages in case you really get into it with hordes of the undead.
I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
The unfortunate reality of our world today is that we’re never quite sure when our comfortable existences will be dramatically disrupted. We can, however, prepare so that we are as ready as possible if that does happen. In this section, we’re going to offer answers to some of the most commonly asked questions about bug out bags so that you can further gather knowledge that will help you make your selection.

Disaster preparedness doesn't need to be complicated, but you’ll find that shopping and collecting gear for a DIY bug out bag can prove to be difficult. In many cases, the DIY approach may prove more expensive than necessary, leaving you with items you don’t really need—and shouldn’t waste your money on. Instead of forcing useless items into a bag that won’t hold up, opt for a pre-packed, top-rated bug out bag. 
Some will think the omission of foodstuffs from this bug out bag to be a bit odd but it’s not if you think about it. It might be years before you have to use the bag so it makes sense that you’ll want to procure your own emergency rations and review their condition a couple of times a year, replacing anything that might look dodgy. That said this bug out bag does emergency kit right with the aforementioned items as well as a dozen pouches of purified water, rain ponchos, quality toothbrush and toothpaste, shaving razor, comb, emergency whistle, emergency blankets, survival handbook, duct tape (!), paracord and more. There’s also the obligatory deck of cards for when you finally settle into the emergency shelter. Toss in some dry clothes for everyone involved, charger cords for your smartphone in case you run into a power source and a good book or two and you’ll be ready to wait out events in good shape.
We need to be able to regulate temperature because as a species, we cannot survive in extreme temperatures. There is actually an extremely small range of temperatures that humans can survive comfortably – it ranges from about 70 F to 90 F, depending on wind chill and humidity. We’re extremely fragile creatures. Any colder or hotter than this narrow band of temperatures and you’re in danger. You might think that 70 F sounds comfortable, but remember – that’s one of the reasons why we wear clothing. In our natural state, we are not very durable creatures at all. Clothing is a form of temperature regulation, as is shelter.
Water is truly the staff of life, without it, you will die in just a few days.  Assume that for whatever reason, your taps won’t work – there is no water coming into your home.  What else do you have?  Do you have bottled water somewhere?  Did you know there is about 50 gallons of water stored in your water heater?  There’s also a few gallons in the tank of your toilet!  If you have an outside water source – such as a lake, creek or storm drain – do you have a way to filter it?  Your first goal with water should be to be able to provide your family with 2 weeks worth of water and a way to continue filtering found water after that.  Here is a great place to start learning about water.

There are several different biomes in Conan Exiles. Barren wastelands, harsh deserts, sparkling rivers, and haunted forests are just a few of the ones you'll encounter, but you'll want to get out there and really explore the environment. Every biome holds different secrets to discover and, more importantly, different materials so you can craft new stuff, which is always satisfying. Exploring also lets you scout out enemies that you plan to attack, find new areas you want to settle, or even make new friends to cohabit the area with. You'll have to explore whether you want to or not, but Conan Exiles makes it very enjoyable by making sure it's a rewarding experience. See More
I found your post to be very thoughtful to be concerned about the poor. I rely heavily on ‘prepping’ ideas and ‘how to’ from those ‘without’. They are survivors that know how to do more with less. These folks are labeled as ‘poor’ because they do not have $$$, I would suggest that many ‘poor’ have a ‘wealth’ of knowledge to survive in such situations.
I used to have bug out bag but not anymore because we are living in the end times, the rapture and the 7 year Tribulation are right around the corner. Get rapture ready, people: accept JESUS CHRIST as your personal Lord and Savior who paid on the cross for our sins and came back to life on the 3rd day!!! We have to come to the cross as broken sinners.

If you’re content with fighting against disease, bodily functions, and zombies who occasionally phase through walls, you’ll get to DayZ’s best feature: exploration. The world of Chernarus is a Soviet wasteland, and Bohemia has captured that Eastern Bloc atmosphere with the towns and villages around the map. DayZ’s forests feel genuinely life-like rather than being man-made imitations, while there’s a true sense of isolation out in the wilderness.
×