You prepare everyday. When you were young you learned to tie your shoes, put your own clothes on etc etc etc. Now you are older and it is time to re learn those same SELF reliance skills. What good are you to others if you are amongst the masses of unprepared. How can you possibly help your fellow man if you are not ready yourself? I say it makes you MORE christian. By the way there were plenty of christians that lived in the dark ages. Just be aware and keep your eyes open.

I love the post, and the comments… heck the entire site is ingenious. If I could make a tiny contribution it would be the ICSB kit. It’s something I took away from my earliest days in LRS. It’s true that we seem to have kits within kits (hygiene kit, med kit, fishing kit all packed into a bug out kit) but it’s a handy way of compartmentalising our kit for quick access. Being able to access things quickly quietly and sometimes in the dark can be a lifesaver. So I offer up the ICSB kit. Stands for In Case S#$& Breaks. Some of the items are already on your lists but it’s nice to have them all in the same place when something breaks at the least opportune time. It’s a little pouch with duct tape, bailing wire, super glue, safety pins. Zip ties, key rings, buttons, carpet thread, twine, and anything else that is small and fits into this category. Anyway, that’s my two bits. Thanks for all the good info.


A very detailed and extensive list! But the only problem I have is all the electrical stuff. When we had survival training after qualifying, We were very limited in the tools they gave us, but we managed (basically eating everything we could). When hiking/camping for several days we always have the best experience without bringing any electrical gear.

The Bug Out vs. Bug In is something I wish I would have read about earlier in my prepping. I made the assumption getting out was the only option. The reality is though, I’m nearly 60 and disabled from Degenerative Joint Disease, therefore, Bugging Out is the last option I should choose. The list of potential factors to help you determine BO vs. BI are many and the list seems to grow daily. What size community is the line in the sand in determining it’s best to leave? What is the SHTF event(s)? And 100’s of other questions and potential scenarios that could play out.

Tom,Great Post!Lisa, I have been reading your blog and lieavng on the screen for my wife to absorb. You did a great job in the interview!! You are always so pleasant with your replies to everyone on your blog as well! There are are so many good resources on the innertubes…….APN, The Survival Mom, Survival Blog, The Survivalist Blog…..all with unique viewpoints. We are blessed to have such strong and valuable viewpoints!MNAZ
We can only survive for three hours in extreme heat or cold – and most places in the world, including most of the USA, experiences either extreme heat or extreme cold (or both in some cases) depending on the time of the year. Would you be able to survive comfortably in the dead of winter without any form of electricity or heating? Do you have a stockpile of resources that will allow you to build fires the old-fashioned way through the whole of winter? What about if you’re away from your home when something catastrophic occurs? Do you have easy access to materials to be able to improvise a shelter or tent?
The second aspect of prepping (and some feel this is even more important than the first) is the acquisition of survival knowledge. Feeding your family becomes a lot easier if you know how to hunt or fish, or if you know how to grow or raise your own food. Getting your hands on drinking water is made more challenging if you don’t know how to find safe water in the wild, and if you don’t know how to turn unsafe water into drinkable water. Defending your family against wild animals or dangerous looters is safer if you know how to wield a firearm, have experience with primitive weapons, or know martial arts and self defense. Treating wounds and illnesses is more of a possibility if you can recognize medicinal plants in the wild and know what they can be used for. All of these skills were probably pretty commonplace two hundred years ago, but nowadays most people are woefully under prepared for any kind of true survival situation.
I think you’re both correct, although you are addressing separate threat levels and emergencies (civil disobedience vs. natural disaster). I keep a basic bag, plus a small box with optionals that can be quickly loaded, depending on the threat. I realize this may take precious seconds, so this is time dependent. I live in the Chicago area, so civil unrest is a greater concern, and my firearms choice reflects this probable eventuality.
At the most basic level, the word prepping is simply short for “preparing” or “preparation”, but in modern usage it’s come to be associated specifically with preparations for large scale disasters and catastrophes. Things as common as stocking up on a canned goods in anticipation of a major storm, or having a good first-aid kit around the house could be described as a type of prepping, but it could also go much further than that.
There is a delicate balance between exploring and surviving, and every aspect of gameplay is closely related. The amount of activity the player performs and the distance they can travel and explore, are balanced around certain metrics such as time, warmth, and calories - and all of these game systems are closely related resulting in a finely tuned experience. For example, eating food replenishes calories, but in order to find food, you have to explore and salvage which causes you to burn calories in the first place. The player must watch how many calories they burn, even when sleeping, and make sure they find or hunt enough food to keep themselves going. On top of this, the player needs to seek shelter from the cold, make sure they are wearing the appropriate clothing, and build fires to stay warm and cook food. During your explorations to salvage supplies and look for food items, you will need to explore carefully as to not get stuck without a place to sleep for the night. See More
The bag can be loaded and then cinched down with compression straps to keep your gear from shifting. The bag has 11 different exterior pouches allowing for good organization. The bag comes loaded with PALS webbing which allows any MOLLE webbing accessory to be added. The price point is good since the quality is high and the pack is so large.  The carrying capacity of the bag is 173 liters and comes with a Lifetime Warranty.
There are of course cheaper and more complicated ways of building up your clean water stockpile, but we won’t get into those in this article. If you’re just starting to learn about prepping, the discussions of plastic versus glass containers and the size and appropriate storage and sealing methods for those containers can get overwhelming pretty quickly. We’d say keep it simple, bite the bullet and just buy the water you need pre-portioned to sidestep all the complications.
Terraria uses a bright color palette and an upbeat chiptune soundtrack to ease you into its world. However, once you start exploring and spend time in it you'll notice it's not as cozy as it first seemed to be. Blood Moons that rouse the dead from their graves. Goblin armies trying to destroy everything in their wake. Vast and dark cave systems, filled with odd creatures and various dangers. Ancient ruins, teeming with the restless dead and evil spirits. Pockets of decaying land, thriving with misshapen monstrosities. It's really fun to explore and discover something new about the world of Terraria. See More
Tent: In many emergency situations, shelter may be hard to find. While packing a traditional tent may not be a viable option, a good bug out bag should always include a waterproof survival tent. The best survival tents are made of Mylar, which can retain heat and repel water. Pro-tip: Be sure to stack leaves, grass or anything else from around the campsite against the tent for added protection from the elements.
Jonathan Volk (Department of Public Health, San Francisco) and colleagues at other institutions observed that intermittent PrEPping could improve adherence, cut costs and side effects, and make sense for people who "only perceive themselves to be at risk at certain periods (eg, weekends, vacations), and thus are not willing to take a daily pill." (30) But TDF/ FTC dosing just before and after sex, as in the macaque studies, will work only for people who have sex fewer than three times a week (otherwise you still need near-daily dosing) and for people who plan sex ahead of time and have TDF/FTC on hand.
Getting together a group of friends to play Don't Starve Together adds a lot of enjoyment to the game. If you're all first timers, learning how to survive as you go along is amazing, since you get to share in the learning process and the experience together. As you craft and build your own forts, farms, and more, you find more and more ways to learn how to survive, making things less daunting than if you play the game alone. See More

As important as the size of the pack you choose is the comfort of the pack. Many of the packs that we reviewed have compression straps, extra padding, and other features to ensure that your body is healthy and able to carry what you need. In general, comfort is largely a balance between enough padding and a lighter weight so that the bag doesn’t hinder your ability to move efficiently. When you’re considering the comfort of a given bug out bag, you’ll also want to pay extra attention to how the pack’s hip belt is constructed.

This grim tale of endurance has become infamous for its naked men – but it’s not the size of a man’s particulars that’s impressive about Facepunch’s survival game (and we all know that doesn’t matter anyway… right?). No, it’s the forts that players are able to, ahem, erect. Rust’s strong point is construction: as you gather materials from its wilderness, you can begin to lay down a variety of items in a Sims-like manner, creating your perfect rural retreat by slotting together floors, walls, staircases, and windows.

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