Browse through our selection of emergency gear to find everything you need to supplement your existing emergency preparedness packs or choose from one of our Emergency Essentials ® survival kits, already assembled and ready for use. We offer kits for individuals and families, filled with the basic tools and emergency gear to survive for up to 72 hours during any emergency situation.


A bug out bag or a tactical backpack,  is a large, accessible, strong, and convenient backpack that you can personalize the contents for your situation. This is a bag that you want to have ready so that you can grab it at a moment’s notice. The pack should always be packed and stored in an accessible place. You never know when you might be forced to leave your home and have to survive on only what is on your back. Not only will you need a pack you will need good quality boots as well.   To help you find the best bug out bag, we have listed out some things to consider when buying.
A very detailed and extensive list! But the only problem I have is all the electrical stuff. When we had survival training after qualifying, We were very limited in the tools they gave us, but we managed (basically eating everything we could). When hiking/camping for several days we always have the best experience without bringing any electrical gear.
Did you know that most people in the United States have less than 2 weeks of food stored in their home?!  If this includes you, it’s time to make a change!  Take a look at your food supplies and estimate how long you could survive on it – for most beginners it’s pretty scary!   Your first goal with food should be to have 1 month worth of meals stored, immediately after that you’re going to get 3 months worth as quickly as possible.  Here is a great place to learn about storing your own food.  Some additional fantastic resources for Food Storage are Everyday Food Storage and Food Storage Made Easy.

People ask if I was in the military. Yeah, but it was 80 lbs and 40 years ago. Special Forces “A TEAM” medic in fact. But I forgot a lot of that. I carried 120 lb rut when we moved out, but about 40 lbs of ammo and grenades on patrol. I have 2 dozen ruts now, from patrol size to major moveout size. I put 80 lbs of cat litter (we have a cat rescue) to practice the other day … and I had a very hard time to get up with it. So I dropped that to 40 and hit the treadmill 3 miles and 3 mph. I will need to do that for awhile before increasing the weight. I’m 220 wanting 180 but at 66 yrs it’s becoming harder to do things. Hips, knees, shoulders, knuckles .. they are all stiff and ache. So I may have to cut back. But to tell someone just bring 12 rounds of ammo …… that’s crazy. Get an AR in 22 cal, the Ruger Takedown fits well in our ruts. 300 rnds of 22lr is light. I have a Glock M22 40 can with a 22 conversion that works great, same for 1911 45 / 22. In reality, it all comes down as to what the threat is perceived to be. CPAP: my new one is 10 oz, and 6 days of rechargeable batteries are 4 lbs. Solar panel or 110 to recharge the batteries. Forget the CPAP = loud snoring and dog tired wakeup.

There are a number of emergency food storage methods that are worth learning about to extend the shelf life of typical stockpile foods. These methods sometimes require modern equipment which you may not want to get your hands on – if that’s the case, you can instead read up on primitive food storage methods, which would include skills like fermentation and smoking/curing meat.
I found your post to be very thoughtful to be concerned about the poor. I rely heavily on ‘prepping’ ideas and ‘how to’ from those ‘without’. They are survivors that know how to do more with less. These folks are labeled as ‘poor’ because they do not have $$$, I would suggest that many ‘poor’ have a ‘wealth’ of knowledge to survive in such situations.
We had huge barrels that we went to a neighbors pond, with permission, and got water to flush our toilets with. We had chest of ice water, tub full of water. We had collected a hangup shower, cold but a shower! Bug meds etc… Tons of can goods, mre’s and those heater meals! Not to mention we had lots of canned sodas and other sorted drinks. Stay away from the booze for drinking but is great to trade with.
An excellent resource regarding bug out bags is a new book by Max Cooper called, “Realistic Bug Out Bag, 2nd Edition: Prepared to Survive.” This is a monster book at over 600+ pages. It has scenarios, drills, and is full of useful and insightful information. I like that the author stresses planning and has a section devoted to bug out plans and how to practice & train your plan. He is also a huge advocate of designing a BOB that fits your needs based on factors that pertain to your situation. I highly recommend this book.
We live in KY also and would like to start prepping trying to find some land right now have lived on a small farm had chickens miss it so much .We live in town now wanting to get back to the country we would like to start storeing but dont have alot of room where we are at now .I think we need to be prepared for anything nice to know someone else in ky feels the same.By the way I am married and me and my husband has 4 kids Hope you have a blessed day

Don’t Starve focuses heavily on crafting to make your way through life, and so much of your time is spent harvesting raw materials – just like a crafting game. But rather than crafting houses like in Rust and Minecraft, this indie game is all about the tools and contraptions you can make. The Science Machine and Alchemy Engine will become your best friends, before making way for ancient wonders and the art of magic. Like Minecraft, Don’t Starve happily embraces the mad and the mystical, and is all the more enjoyable for it.
Great article on getting started. I began my prepping journey a little over a year ago starting in a little different order. My first prepping item purchase was a firearm, specifically a semi-automatic 12 gauge shotgun. I’ve since amassed ammo in various shot sizes for it as well as slugs. All with the idea in mind to use it for self defense and hunting; birds, rabbits, possibly blacktail deer. 
The next consideration is storage. While water doesn’t expire, it can be contaminated – and most frequently this contamination happens because of the storage vessel. The best way to store water is in food safe plastic – it’s cheap and most water you’d buy comes already in it. Ideally, you want the water fully sealed when not in use, which is why the easiest way to stock up on water is simply to buy a few of these 12 packs of 1.5 liter bottles on Amazon. It’s not the most economical way to go about it, but it’s the most straightforward. To meet the two week emergency water threshold for a family of four, you’d want to order 6 of these water packs. This makes storage extremely easy – you use water as you need, the rest of it remains sealed, and you don’t need to worry about it. When storing water, keep it in a cool, dark place away from direct sunlight as much as possible.
Plan your bag with a defined time period in mind.  72 hours is a good starting point as this is approximately how long a person can survive without water.  Once you start planning for weeks out you will have added too many complications to your list of Bug Out Bag essentials.  Have a look at our post on Making a Bug Out Plan to see what you need to consider as a part of your survival preparedness.
Prepping is kinda associated with people who prep for stupidly over the top unlikely SHTF scenarios were if the world as we know it has gone then yes maybe a lot of electronics will be useless, but not all, the longer you keep your mobile alive the longer you could have access to what is basically an e-reader which could house millions of survival books and associated materials like mechanics, first aid etc etc, I’d rather carry my tiny phone and a few batteries and a small solar charger than the weight of a stack of books, because in reality you’d need much more knowledge to survive than the significant majority of people possess in their heads, knowledge is power.

I just bought property and I built a home far from any city (its actually on its own Island in Alaska) I have my own river for fresh water, a greenhouse and gardens as well as renewable power (windmills, dam, and solar panels). plus being as I live in Alaska I have plenty of guns and ammo for hunting. I own a fishing boat as well so food will be abundant as long as I can use it. I am completely self sufficient out here. BUT, I need to known if there is a list of things that I should have. The food is stocked for two years or more, but I want livestock ideas as well as ideas of medical supplies ect. Please let me know if there is any such list.
That’s it, you’ve survived! Whether battling a ruthless xeno aboard Alien: Isolation’s Sevastopol or outlasting 99 other players with the help of our PUBG tips, the above titles aren’t just deliciously tense – they’re some of the best PC games available. As you wait for the best upcoming PC games to hit Steam, why not get familiar with some of the survival sensations above. Just remember to keep a calm head and take regular deep breaths. Do that, and survival is assured.
It’s all well and good that you’ve finally realized that there may be cases where you’ll have to leave the house if there’s a flood, fire, earthquake, tornado, or laser attack from Mars, but where will you go and how will you get there? When you’re a beginning prepper, you may not need to go to the extent of having a complete bug out route assessment, but you should have the basics of where you’re going to go.
Everything Ark does is rock-solid. The survival elements may be similar to what you’ve played before, but they’re the bedrock for the game’s more ambitious elements (and a strong Ark mods scene). Your character has RPG-like stats, and you can head into the world to hunt sci-fi secrets that offer a little more incentive to play rather than just ‘stay alive’.
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