Did you know that most people in the United States have less than 2 weeks of food stored in their home?!  If this includes you, it’s time to make a change!  Take a look at your food supplies and estimate how long you could survive on it – for most beginners it’s pretty scary!   Your first goal with food should be to have 1 month worth of meals stored, immediately after that you’re going to get 3 months worth as quickly as possible.  Here is a great place to learn about storing your own food.  Some additional fantastic resources for Food Storage are Everyday Food Storage and Food Storage Made Easy.
The next consideration is storage. While water doesn’t expire, it can be contaminated – and most frequently this contamination happens because of the storage vessel. The best way to store water is in food safe plastic – it’s cheap and most water you’d buy comes already in it. Ideally, you want the water fully sealed when not in use, which is why the easiest way to stock up on water is simply to buy a few of these 12 packs of 1.5 liter bottles on Amazon. It’s not the most economical way to go about it, but it’s the most straightforward. To meet the two week emergency water threshold for a family of four, you’d want to order 6 of these water packs. This makes storage extremely easy – you use water as you need, the rest of it remains sealed, and you don’t need to worry about it. When storing water, keep it in a cool, dark place away from direct sunlight as much as possible.

Rust underwent a massive overhaul that saw most of the original game scrapped in favour of a slightly new approach and completely new base code. The change ripped out quite a lot of the game’s core features, such as zombies and rad towns, but over time they’ve gradually been reapplied alongside new ideas. Rust remains one of the most played games on Steam, and if you’re one of them, be sure to check out these useful Rust console commands.


We also need to figure out what kind of survival equipment we need that will make it easier for us to replenish our needs. As an example of this – we need water to survive. But no matter how much clean drinking water you store up, you’ll run out of it at some point. So we need to figure out what kind of gear we need to purify or distill our own water.
The next consideration is storage. While water doesn’t expire, it can be contaminated – and most frequently this contamination happens because of the storage vessel. The best way to store water is in food safe plastic – it’s cheap and most water you’d buy comes already in it. Ideally, you want the water fully sealed when not in use, which is why the easiest way to stock up on water is simply to buy a few of these 12 packs of 1.5 liter bottles on Amazon. It’s not the most economical way to go about it, but it’s the most straightforward. To meet the two week emergency water threshold for a family of four, you’d want to order 6 of these water packs. This makes storage extremely easy – you use water as you need, the rest of it remains sealed, and you don’t need to worry about it. When storing water, keep it in a cool, dark place away from direct sunlight as much as possible.
Keep in mind, a well-designed bug out bag should weigh no more than 25% of your body weight, assuming you are in average physical condition and are not overweight. Any heavier than that can make carrying the bag highly strenuous and limit your ability to remain mobile and travel long distances on foot during an evacuation. Limit your packing list to the essentials that will help you survive.

Many people, even relatively experienced preppers, often take the first three things for granted, stock up on a bunch of canned goods and assume they’ll survive whatever’s coming. Most other prepping focused websites will spend a bunch of time talking about food storage and preservation, but will neglect the importance of the first three points (and in particular, the importance of breathable air and safe shelter are dangerously overlooked).

Once you’ve considered what you’re at risk for, we’re going to shelve that information for a bit.  The federal government provides some good starting points for considering how to protect yourself (you’ll want to do a lot of research later about how to be safe and survive that scenario).  We’re going to move on to a personal assessment of what you currently have.
I am looking to relocate with the desire for isolation. I would like a region lacking temperature extremes and with more conservative political ideology. I’m currently in Texas and wish a cooler climate but not the other end of the spectrum like Alaska. Married with 8 kids, so a place that can sustain. Fertile soil a must! Do you have any areas in mind, that I can research?
If I could ask a stupid question… I’m planning on immigrating from the US to the UK where some laws are different for preppers. Things that I have here, such as my machete and combat/survival knives are illegal there. As are most firearms without extensive registering and licensing and I’m sure those few with real firearms are on a list there. And likely new immigrants are prohibited from owning firearms and most weapons in general. I also have a future wife and two children there to consider. I’m ex military and martial artist but they aren’t and I want them to be able to get prepared asap. Any suggestions? Thank you immensely for this information and for educating beginner preppers. Contrary to some posts here, many of these items, while perhaps not necessary, can make the difference between life and death or worse the deaths of loved ones. Vaseline, duct and electricical tape, socks, gloves, cotton, fishing gear, strong paracord, and much more have a wide myriad of uses. Also I would suggest getting at least basic military field medical training to treat cuts, infections, GSWs (gunshot wounds), etc. One strong suggestion, I personally would add various sized plastic Ziploc type bags and at least a couple of contractor trash bags. These are indispensable. They can help with distilling water with a solar still in even a post nuke environment, with Vaseline can patch a sucking chest wound, can keep your documents, phone and other paper or electronic equipment dry, etc… In addition, know your surroundings, what’s available, and LEARN TO IMPROVISE. Learn to make a firebow, what wood types in your environment are best, how to make your own fishhooks or fishing spear from wood or bone or scrap metal, etc. A small saw is indispensable. I also have a leatherman tool and a couple of different sized pliers as well as wire cutters and a small coil of wire…which also has a myriad of uses from securing any blade to a handle or shaft to making fish hooks, to even crafting various boobytraps and snares. Be vigilant, know your surroundings and common things and locations you see daily. Make mental note. Learn to braid paracord. Or martial arts. Your most valuable resources you can ever have are your mind and body, keep them honed and healthy and continue to learn and perfect your craft. One last note: nearly anything is possible with the right knowledge. Best wishes to all reading this. ♡
For those who desire a story to go with their survival gaming, The Long Dark offers a fully voiced-acted, five chapter story mode called "Wintermute" complete with cutscenes. It features all the survival gameplay aspects of the sandbox version, as well as story quests and character development, making it an engaging, new way to experience all the game has to offer. In the story, you'll assume the role of a man trying to survive in the harsh Canadian wilderness after crashing his plane during a geomagnetic disaster. Rather than just a no-bones survival situation, you'll be working through an actual storyline as you head for safety. As you progress the story, you'll have the opportunity to do quests, watch voice-acted cutscenes, and interact with other characters who are fighting for their lives as well. This pulls you even deeper into the game world since you now have a real goal to work for - escaping the harsh wilderness alive. Story mode adds a deeper layer of immersion via storytelling than the sandbox mode, which is only about surviving as long as you can. Though currently not all of the chapters are available as they are released episodically over time. See More

This con is a bit dependent on RNG. Your character might end up starting in the middle of the snowy mountains with no clothes or the desert with no water, making it hard to survive at the start. Other times the area could be resource poor, making it hard to build a base and tools and weapons. Or, you could end up spawning in an area filled with some of the hardest zombies in the game with no weapons and poor fighting stats. See More

I like your addition of a bug net. One thing I noticed is that the author correctly says to save space and weight to just pack a tarp. However, where I live, from late May to late September if you don’t pack bug netting, a tent with screens or plenty of bug spray you are going to be itchy, sore and tired from no sleep because you are up all night swatting mosquitoes
I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
Before we get started, if you just want a list of everything you need to have on hand to be ready for a disaster or emergency situation, here’s our full list of essential emergency supplies to survive any disaster. If you’ve acquired everything on that list, it’s fair to say that you’re officially a prepper, and that you’re ready for most survival scenarios.
Keep it SIMPLE – you are not trying to build a mobile home that you will carry around. Many sites list dozens and dozens of items to buy and bring, adding cost and weight.  Remember that electronics need power and are prone to breaking.  Pack simple, reliable, things to cover your basic needs.  Check out our Free Bug Out Bag Planning Tool to plan what you want to include and see how your items will affect the overall weight of your pack.
Taming a low-level dinosaur will take nearly a solid hour of real time, during which you must protect the dino as any predator dino will go right for it. Raising a dino from an egg can take a solid day - as an example, raising an Argentavis with friends will need a special raising process which can take over 12 hours to complete. That's not a hard dino to raise either Look to the Ark wiki or the Dododex site and you'll see some insane numbers there for top-level dinos. So be very aware there's both a personal level grind (many people spend many hours crafting things far past useful quantities just to get levels) and a dino tame grind which can be just unsupportable for anyone with an actual life. Good luck! See More
Jonathan Volk (Department of Public Health, San Francisco) and colleagues at other institutions observed that intermittent PrEPping could improve adherence, cut costs and side effects, and make sense for people who "only perceive themselves to be at risk at certain periods (eg, weekends, vacations), and thus are not willing to take a daily pill." (30) But TDF/ FTC dosing just before and after sex, as in the macaque studies, will work only for people who have sex fewer than three times a week (otherwise you still need near-daily dosing) and for people who plan sex ahead of time and have TDF/FTC on hand.

Just as you might imagine a company called “Ultimate Arms” would produce a bug out bag heavy on weaponry so to you’d be safe in assuming a company called “Food Insurance” would produce a bug out bag tripped out with food rations. This bug out bag eschews the notion that you’ll need to hack your way through starving, blood crazed, fellow survivors and instead assumes you’ll need to eat in order to keep your strength and spirits up should you be dislocated due to natural or man-made disaster. As such there’s ample food for a couple to keep themselves fed for a week or a single person for 2 weeks and still lots of room in the backpack for other things like Uzis, pepper spray and concussion grenades should you feel the need to bring them along.
Even though Conan Exiles is no longer in early access, there are a lot of flaws here and there that add up over time. You have plenty of freedom to roam around, but there's no real sense of progression or a focused storyline. Some areas in the open world just have a bunch of enemies to kill for the sake of killing them. You may also lag a lot, with your character warping around as you try to move. On their own, these things wouldn't be such a big deal, but they really do become a pain as the problems start to stack up. See More
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There is a LOT of information on the web about what to pack in a bug out bag. You first need to figure out what you’re planning on before you can figure out what to put in your bug out bag. My post on 10 tips how to pack a bug out bag could be one place to start. Also check out this page for some ideas of what to pack that you might not have thought of.
In our current economic environment, prices continue to rise. The best time to start investing in your family’s health and safety is now. By making a list of necessities and gradually stocking your survival storage pantry now, you can take advantage of discounts and special pricing. Be proactive. Minimize rotation expenses by choosing supplies with a longer shelf life.

Look for a pack that has multiple compartments, with pockets and organizers built in to help keep track of the small items, and try to pack your BOB strategically with items grouped that you’ll use together. Remember to pack clothes and bulky items on the bottom and heavier items at the top for better weight distribution and to ease the strain on your body.  
The GR1 is a USA made backpack made to Armed Forces specs but with a civilian friendly design. The pack is a favorite among travelers, military personnel, law enforcement, hikers, emergency preppers, students, and of course GORUCK Challenge participants. This pack was specifically built for the Special Forces and has been used in Baghdad and New York City.(2)
Great information. But, please don’t tell people that pepper spray will drop someone in seconds. I was a chemical agent instructor for a medium size police department. I’ve been sprayed by a lot of stuff. Not all of it works on every person. I’ve seen people just sit there and look at you when they were hit full in the face with very good, very reliable chemical agents. We only taught that it was a distraction technique. Use the chemical agent to distract the person so you can hit them next, take them down, flee, whatever your plan is. But, it is only a distraction technique.
was looking to bunk down were i am now but after some research found the house i live in is in the blast radius of a nuke plant and so need to locate another area but i am poor and cant acquire land of any type really . was thinking of bugging out to a state park outside of the blast radius and survive that way.. any thoughts on this? also what would be a good way to stock up supplies my BOV will be my two feet.. i know along way to hike.. but i can clear the main bast site quickly but will take the three days to clear area were food sources will be contaminated…..
A very detailed and extensive list! But the only problem I have is all the electrical stuff. When we had survival training after qualifying, We were very limited in the tools they gave us, but we managed (basically eating everything we could). When hiking/camping for several days we always have the best experience without bringing any electrical gear.
SHTF is an acronym that stands for sh*t hits the fan. This means that something drastic has happened, like a natural disaster, financial crisis, or a war has started. This term is generally used for when things go south quickly. The other acronym that is commonly used to signal it is time to pull out your bug out bag is ‘TEOTWAWKI’. This stands for ‘the end of the world as we know it’.
I found your post to be very thoughtful to be concerned about the poor. I rely heavily on ‘prepping’ ideas and ‘how to’ from those ‘without’. They are survivors that know how to do more with less. These folks are labeled as ‘poor’ because they do not have $$$, I would suggest that many ‘poor’ have a ‘wealth’ of knowledge to survive in such situations.
To me, the best option is to store emergency food. How much? If you have none, store enough for a few days. If you have enough for a few days, get enough for a week. How much you store depends on what time frame you think you're at risk for having to be completely independent. The early settlers of the southwest liked to store enough food for a whole year and still do to this day!
I bought water in gallon jugs, the $.79 Walmart ones. ALL of them leaked after a few months and damaged the area I stored them. Another tip, some foods go bad faster than you think and you may not even know it. Example; We eat lots of taco shells, so I bought several boxes. By the time we got to the the last ones, they looked completely normal but tasted GROOOSSS!! Now I Know to only keep a few boxes at a time. Excellent article!
Why didn’t I put this at the beginning of the list? What are you going to say when they start asking you questions? You need to start your research and get into things a bit before you start trying to get buy-in from your family. It’s extremely important, but not the first thing you should be doing. There’s no particular order to this list, BTW but I was just making a point. Make sure you read this article before you talk to any senior citizens in your family. You’ll be surprised at the background and experience that your older family members actually have.

(Edit: The game actually does have an endless mode with various different maps to chose from.) Frostpunk's main scenario only runs about 45 in-game days (6-12 hours). There is no sandbox mode where you can keep growing and building indefinitely, making it a rather limited simulation experience overall. This may be disappointing to those who would prefer to keep their city going as long as possible. See More

Great post,,, I especially like the tip about not storing food you don’t eat, who wants to be in a survival situation and have to eat food they hate… Things will be bad enough… And what about MRE’s or Dehydrated Foods that we have not tried, I got several dehydrated meals that when I tried them one of the meals was so spicy I would die trying to eat it… Taste before you invest in a stockpile of foods.
For all the stress that some survival games can press on you, nothing compares to the harrowing 2D adventure. As you’ll find out in our This War of Mine review, the game offers a very different breed of survival. It’s a depiction of a group of civilians’ struggling to stay alive in their war-ravaged country. Trapped in a besieged house, pinned down by snipers, and attacked by other survivors looking to take what you’ve found, it’s a game of traumatic decisions and life-or-death consequences. It’s the side of conflict that few war games truly deal with.
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