Finally, having the skills to build a sustainable source of food is a goal for many preppers. However, it’s not easy to do this and it requires substantial time and knowledge to get to the point where you can confidently say that you’d be able to be entirely self reliant on food that you supply yourself. If you want to start down this path, you can read about the best survival animals to raise, the top 10 seeds to grow in a survival situation, and survival composting.

Keep in mind, a well-designed bug out bag should weigh no more than 25% of your body weight, assuming you are in average physical condition and are not overweight. Any heavier than that can make carrying the bag highly strenuous and limit your ability to remain mobile and travel long distances on foot during an evacuation. Limit your packing list to the essentials that will help you survive.

My suggestion would be to find a meetup group in your area that deals with prepping. Being a part of a community is beneficial to all parties involved in that all individuals within the group bring something of benefit. They will be able to help you get situated and understand what you can do with your limited income and health concerns. Also, if the group is really a preppers group, they will all be able to assist you, give you advice, and will be people that you can lean on should disaster strike. Where do you live in Tornado alley and have you contacted your local police or sheriff’s department? They usually have an Emergency Management Department where you can get information on where disaster shelters are and what locations in your area are to avoid in the event of a disaster. Also, look at getting involved with a local CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) and if there ins’t one then speak with local law enforcement or fire/rescue about getting one started. This will give you basic information on Fire/Rescue, Search and Rescue Operations, and general information on disaster services at no cost to you. Also, look up the Emergency Management Institute (operated through FEMA) which offers classes in all areas of disaster at no additional charge either, giving you a better understanding of how the federal, state, local, and tribal organizations will operate during disasters and what you can do to further prepare. Education of disasters that effect your area and what your local governments are prepared to do to aid you in them is the first line of prepping, an uneducated prepper is a dead prepper. Hope this helps.
The bag can be loaded and then cinched down with compression straps to keep your gear from shifting. The bag has 11 different exterior pouches allowing for good organization. The bag comes loaded with PALS webbing which allows any MOLLE webbing accessory to be added. The price point is good since the quality is high and the pack is so large.  The carrying capacity of the bag is 173 liters and comes with a Lifetime Warranty.
Plastic is a tricky thing. Clear hard plastic jugs like from companies like…Crystal Geyser, Alhambra etc. Are better for storing water in as far as plastic goes. The foggy white “milk Jug” style will break down fast and sadly leak in your cupboards. IF that is all you can get, I suggest storing in the garage or a place with good flooring and maybe even put into garbage bag in case.

With the world seeming to become a more volatile and dangerous place with every encroaching year, it can be hard to know exactly where you can feel safe. The modern media is overloaded with stories about violence, crime, and sensational pieces on the worst people in our society. But there have to be some places within the United States where the chances of anything like that happening to you is next to impossible, right?
I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
We actually have an entire section on the site dedicated to the steps you need to take to cover your basic needs as dictated by the survival rule of three – food, water, and shelter (and breathable air). It covers all the survival skills and knowledge relevant to self sufficiency in these areas. If your goal is to go beyond being a prepper and you want to be a true survival expert, definitely check out that section of the site and read everything you’re able to.
I may have been a bit dramatic in my response in cases, but mainly to show you the absurdity of the way you dramatically declare most of that useful kit should be discarded, as if you know best, as if you’ve been there done it, survived, worn the t-shirt, as if you think you’re come special forces commando that has survived behind enemy lines in every environment/climate the globe has to offer, totally ignoring the idiosyncrasies of each location around the world, for example you say knife .22 and “dump the rest”, because people living in an area with limited game but masses of water and fish to ditch their fishing line, hooks, weights etc for a .22… OK yea, I know who not to join up with in a disaster, the man carrying a f*cking sword to a gun fight
There are a number of emergency food storage methods that are worth learning about to extend the shelf life of typical stockpile foods. These methods sometimes require modern equipment which you may not want to get your hands on – if that’s the case, you can instead read up on primitive food storage methods, which would include skills like fermentation and smoking/curing meat.
I found your post to be very thoughtful to be concerned about the poor. I rely heavily on ‘prepping’ ideas and ‘how to’ from those ‘without’. They are survivors that know how to do more with less. These folks are labeled as ‘poor’ because they do not have $$$, I would suggest that many ‘poor’ have a ‘wealth’ of knowledge to survive in such situations.
Not every damn thing needs multiplayer, and multiplayer can often ruin an otherwise incredible experience. There's none to be found here, and that intensifies the lonely atmosphere. Also, the creators didn't waste resources on something that would fundamentally undermine the experience so they could focus on making the game the wonderful thing that it is. See More
Browse through our selection of emergency gear to find everything you need to supplement your existing emergency preparedness packs or choose from one of our Emergency Essentials ® survival kits, already assembled and ready for use. We offer kits for individuals and families, filled with the basic tools and emergency gear to survive for up to 72 hours during any emergency situation.
Don’t forget spices and nutritional supplements. Yes, you can plan a well-balanced diet with prepared foods, but not everyone has the same taste. Spices and herbs allow you to change up the flavor of the same basic ingredients for variety and interest. Vitamins and supplements are an important addition to your emergency supply stash. Choose nutrition bars, protein powder, or multivitamin capsules that support nutrition and boost natural immunity.
I love the post, and the comments… heck the entire site is ingenious. If I could make a tiny contribution it would be the ICSB kit. It’s something I took away from my earliest days in LRS. It’s true that we seem to have kits within kits (hygiene kit, med kit, fishing kit all packed into a bug out kit) but it’s a handy way of compartmentalising our kit for quick access. Being able to access things quickly quietly and sometimes in the dark can be a lifesaver. So I offer up the ICSB kit. Stands for In Case S#$& Breaks. Some of the items are already on your lists but it’s nice to have them all in the same place when something breaks at the least opportune time. It’s a little pouch with duct tape, bailing wire, super glue, safety pins. Zip ties, key rings, buttons, carpet thread, twine, and anything else that is small and fits into this category. Anyway, that’s my two bits. Thanks for all the good info.
Look for a pack that has multiple compartments, with pockets and organizers built in to help keep track of the small items, and try to pack your BOB strategically with items grouped that you’ll use together. Remember to pack clothes and bulky items on the bottom and heavier items at the top for better weight distribution and to ease the strain on your body.  
While there are many servers where the traditional shoot-on-sight mentality exists, Rust has plenty of havens for those looking for a more civilised lifestyle. You can find player-created towns, complete with attempts at government, trading, and even prisons. It’s one of the nicest reminders that if people pull together and share their resources, fantastic achievements can be made.
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