For now I am planning on bugging-in in the suburbs while maintaining the ability to quickly bug-out if necessary. I am considering buying an isolated piece of property that would still be reached within a two day hike if necessary. Once I find that property I'll plan accordingly and stock some thing there with the plan of bugging-out sooner rather than later.
Have been prepping for about two years. Have an abundant supply of food, water, weapons, etc. Problem is our home is indefensible. We are in the Casa Grande area of Arizona and would like to find an affordable bugout location to build a more defendable home or to share an existing site with like minded people. Have no problem with leaving Arizona if need be. Would also like to be able to talk with like minded people in our area.

I lived through hurricane Katrina. Katrina really hit Mississippi not New Orleans. Where as NO flooded we had entire towns gone, nothing left not even debris as it floated out to sea. I lived about 30 minutes inland and lost part of my roof, my pump house, 2 acres of fence and about 50 trees. We had no electricity for 3 months and no phone service for 6 months. I had NO clue how to survive but my father was with us and really helped out.
An excellent resource regarding bug out bags is a new book by Max Cooper called, “Realistic Bug Out Bag, 2nd Edition: Prepared to Survive.” This is a monster book at over 600+ pages. It has scenarios, drills, and is full of useful and insightful information. I like that the author stresses planning and has a section devoted to bug out plans and how to practice & train your plan. He is also a huge advocate of designing a BOB that fits your needs based on factors that pertain to your situation. I highly recommend this book.
Pack things that make you self-sufficient – if you are thinking about an item that you will need to pair with something that you are going to need to source on the way, forget it.  If you are moving to safety, the last thing you want to do is worry about scavenging.  Pack complementary and multi-purpose items that can be used both individually and together to save space.

I too live in a remote Alaskan location. I am facing the same dilema with the livestock concern. Heating a building year round just to keep your chickens alive sure does not seem appealing. I would however, recommend you getting fishing nets to catch “bulk” fish in the summer and since you have solar panels, and an extra freezer to store the fish in to get through the winter. I also have an ice auger and tip ups for winter time fishing. As far as medical kits, I have an extensive one to say the least. It contains everything needed to perform any type of minor surgery and some major surgery operations. Sutures, staple kits, scapels and TONS of gauze and pain medication!! Also dental kits and means to repair broken caps or teeth. Good luck to you, sounds as if you are doing very well in your setup =)
What I will do is recommend that you build your own First Aid Kit instead of buying one of those prepackaged first aid kits that claim to have 1001 things to get you through any emergency. While some are ok, in my experience these types of kits are usually filled with a lot of stuff you are unlikely to need and not enough of the things you will probably need a lot of.
If you prefer building, creative mode is the way to go. It immediately gives you unlimited blocks, the ability to fly, and immortality. This allows you to easily build anything you want without worrying about height or enemies. Things like giant castles, villages, roller coasters, and even unique builds such as the Enterprise from Star Trek. You can really let your creativity loose. See More
When loaded and put on properly, your hips should carry the bulk of your pack’s weight. Because of this, extra padding in the hip belt can make a lot of difference. However, you should also make sure the hip belt isn’t so bulky that it ends up rubbing your hip bones or ribs uncomfortably. In an ideal world, your bug out bag’s hip belt should fit comfortably between the top of your hip bones and the bottom of your lowest ribs. 
We also need to figure out what kind of survival equipment we need that will make it easier for us to replenish our needs. As an example of this – we need water to survive. But no matter how much clean drinking water you store up, you’ll run out of it at some point. So we need to figure out what kind of gear we need to purify or distill our own water.
Hi, Ive been prepping for 5 years now. Ive learned many of the pitfalls and pipe dreams of preppers the hard way. I have alot of info on prepping–things I thought were basic knowledge but I find are actually useful to other preppers and I am more than happy to share any and all sources from building a bunker (for less than 20K) to suppliers of food, water (WIse is great by the way) to how to obtain meds to medical training in a wilderness setting and books that are also helpful and good quik reference. If you have a question please write me and I will do my best to answer it. Artofmal@aol.com. I am not a professional in the prepping industry, just an average joe who doesnt want to end up with no options which many will have to endure. Best of luck to everyone.
just remember to rotate your canned meats. They don’t last as long as fruits and veggies. For all you canners out there, you can can beans as well. Because beans take a 12 hour soak before you can start cooking, they are not a quick solution to a meal. If you can them (it takes a pressure cooker) they are cooked and ready to heat and eat. There are excellent books on Amazon about this. There is a whole series of I can can books, like meat, beans, dairy etc.
Just as you might imagine a company called “Ultimate Arms” would produce a bug out bag heavy on weaponry so to you’d be safe in assuming a company called “Food Insurance” would produce a bug out bag tripped out with food rations. This bug out bag eschews the notion that you’ll need to hack your way through starving, blood crazed, fellow survivors and instead assumes you’ll need to eat in order to keep your strength and spirits up should you be dislocated due to natural or man-made disaster. As such there’s ample food for a couple to keep themselves fed for a week or a single person for 2 weeks and still lots of room in the backpack for other things like Uzis, pepper spray and concussion grenades should you feel the need to bring them along.
You can enact and carry out laws in your city that will affect both the survival and happiness of your citizens in interesting ways. These moral choices add an entertaining and engaging depth to gameplay. For example, if your workers are frostbitten, you can house them in hospitals which costs resources. Otherwise, you can choose to amputate them which effectively takes them out of your workforce, yet they still have to be housed, kept warm, and fed. Children can be kept protected and warm, or you can send them off in the frozen wasteland to work like the adults. Every single action you take affects how content or upset your population is. Whether you keep them safe and warm, or make tough calls in the name of survival is your choice. These systems must be carefully balanced if you want to succeed. All in all, Frostpunk offers no shortage of interesting moral choices for you to make. See More

Getting together a group of friends to play Don't Starve Together adds a lot of enjoyment to the game. If you're all first timers, learning how to survive as you go along is amazing, since you get to share in the learning process and the experience together. As you craft and build your own forts, farms, and more, you find more and more ways to learn how to survive, making things less daunting than if you play the game alone. See More

There are two main aspects to becoming a successful prepper. The first is the storage of resources. Our goal is to be prepared for a disaster that potentially leads to a lack of access to electricity, to clean water, and to food. To be prepared, we need to figure out what we can live without, and start to store up some of the things we can’t live without. Food and water are probably the first things you think of, but you also need to think about first aid and medical needs, items that help with light and heat, and so forth.


My husband and I have just started prepping and I can’t read enough information on what we should be doing to prepare. Our biggest questions seem to be about where to find a safe place to go. We live in Ohio right now but plan on moving to Tennessee (Cumberland area) in 3 years. I’ve read a little about the area but I’m not really convinced this is a safe area to stay. Anyone’s thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Once you’ve got basic stockpiles and plans for meeting all of your basic survival needs, you can move on to skill acquisition. This is where you go from the basics to becoming a certain “type” of prepper. We’ve already gone over some of the skills relevant to shelters, food, and water, but there are a huge variety of useful skills and knowledge that you can pick up that might come in handy in a true disaster scenario. Make sure you check out our survival skills section – pick and choose the things that interest you the most.
Build Quality – The last thing you want is to be trudging through the windswept landscape trying to escape the oncoming storm surge and have your pack split open and spill your survival gear all over the place. The bug out bag should be made of durable, water resistant nylon and have high quality zippers (waterproof if possible) and double stitching all around. The shoulder straps should be firmly affixed to the bag and be well padded to help absorb the load you’re carrying. And if there’s a waist strap it too should be well-padded and preferably adjustable to accommodate people of different heights.
The Stealth Tactical bug out bag assumes that you have not been able to make it to a shelter and will need to fend for yourself in the outdoors. As such there’s plenty of tactical gear to keep you moving, keep you dry, keep you hydrated and keep you safe. That includes a dozen packets of purified water, rain ponchos, emergency sleeping bags, a fire starting kit, survival knife, foldable saw, emergency whistle, first aid kit, paracord, multi tool, candles and even a stethoscope so you can monitor your health.
The Ready America Deluxe Emergency Kit is a bug out bag with serious survival in mind. As such it’s heavy on practical, tactical gear such as dust masks, duct tape, a multi tool, rain ponchos, protective goggles, a well-equipped first aid kit and maybe most impressive of all, a 4 function emergency power station that requires no batteries or power cord and acts as a flashlight, radio, emergency siren and cell phone charger. Just crank it for 1 minute to get 30 minutes of power for the various functions. Clever and essential survival kit.
At the most basic level, the word prepping is simply short for “preparing” or “preparation”, but in modern usage it’s come to be associated specifically with preparations for large scale disasters and catastrophes. Things as common as stocking up on a canned goods in anticipation of a major storm, or having a good first-aid kit around the house could be described as a type of prepping, but it could also go much further than that.
I agree with all except this one, “you should carry a water filter instead.” That water filter does NOT filter viruses which can incapacitate or kill just as quickly as can the bacteria it does eliminate. Carry purification tablets & a couple gallon sized double-ziplock baggies or an aluminum/titanium pot (multiple uses) or learn about SODIS instead. Why plan to fail?
You will be able to prep only at the basic level (to withstand about a week or so of unrest, Im speaking of civil unrest. Any type of chemical or nuclear attack and it is very unlikely you will not survive in an apt structure) You need two weeks of food and water–long term food storage items, not items from the local grocery store. You also should purchase a gun for each of you and take some shooting classes at the shooting range. Lastly, You need to stock up on any perscription medications you take on a regular basis, you can accomplish this by ‘losing’ a perscription every now and then and having the pharmacist replace it. You should have no less than 6 months of perscriptions even if you only have limited food and water–it can also be used to bargain with later. Best of luck to you.
I too live in a remote Alaskan location. I am facing the same dilema with the livestock concern. Heating a building year round just to keep your chickens alive sure does not seem appealing. I would however, recommend you getting fishing nets to catch “bulk” fish in the summer and since you have solar panels, and an extra freezer to store the fish in to get through the winter. I also have an ice auger and tip ups for winter time fishing. As far as medical kits, I have an extensive one to say the least. It contains everything needed to perform any type of minor surgery and some major surgery operations. Sutures, staple kits, scapels and TONS of gauze and pain medication!! Also dental kits and means to repair broken caps or teeth. Good luck to you, sounds as if you are doing very well in your setup =)
These days news carries quicker via modern tech such as mobile phones and social media networks, this modern equipment maybe the only way you can get news early into any disaster, news that could be vital to your survival by giving you the information needed to decide how to proceed in the safest fashion, such as government advice what to do based on the information they have but you do not.
If you’re content with fighting against disease, bodily functions, and zombies who occasionally phase through walls, you’ll get to DayZ’s best feature: exploration. The world of Chernarus is a Soviet wasteland, and Bohemia has captured that Eastern Bloc atmosphere with the towns and villages around the map. DayZ’s forests feel genuinely life-like rather than being man-made imitations, while there’s a true sense of isolation out in the wilderness.
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