In 7DTD players don't build their homes only as bases or places to sleep in, or build cool looking things just for the fun of it and to test their skills. Every 7 days, a large horde of zombies will attack the player wherever he or she is, trying to destroy them and what stands in the way of the player and the horde. This is why the player needs to think about how to build traps that will help them kill a lot of zombies and how to make a strong enough house that will not be destroyed easily. See More
Astroneer isn’t quite as bleak as most other survival games, despite being just as treacherous. There’s a gorgeous low-poly art style that promises to soothe you as you crest every new horizon, and then there’s the fact that you can have your pals join you at any time thanks to drop-in/drop-out co-op. There’s a sense of progression in Astroneer, too, as you can eventually blast off and start colonising the other six planets in your solar system, providing tangible goals for you to work towards rather than mere existence.
We also need to figure out what kind of survival equipment we need that will make it easier for us to replenish our needs. As an example of this – we need water to survive. But no matter how much clean drinking water you store up, you’ll run out of it at some point. So we need to figure out what kind of gear we need to purify or distill our own water.
There is a delicate balance between exploring and surviving, and every aspect of gameplay is closely related. The amount of activity the player performs and the distance they can travel and explore, are balanced around certain metrics such as time, warmth, and calories - and all of these game systems are closely related resulting in a finely tuned experience. For example, eating food replenishes calories, but in order to find food, you have to explore and salvage which causes you to burn calories in the first place. The player must watch how many calories they burn, even when sleeping, and make sure they find or hunt enough food to keep themselves going. On top of this, the player needs to seek shelter from the cold, make sure they are wearing the appropriate clothing, and build fires to stay warm and cook food. During your explorations to salvage supplies and look for food items, you will need to explore carefully as to not get stuck without a place to sleep for the night. See More
The first thing to do to ensure that you have access to clean water is to stockpile it. An average person needs about a half gallon a day of drinking water, so for a family of four, you need 2 gallons of water a day. FEMA recommends that you store up to three days worth of water to deal with shortages and such, but as preppers, we’re planning for scenarios that go beyond the typical natural disasters you see. We recommend having a stockpile of at least 2 weeks worth of water, which means you should have about 28 gallons of water stored at any given time.
If everyone is prepping, doesn’t this make us less humans and less Christians. We are preparing for maybe two weeks, but if something like what they are describing happens, It will set up the earth back to the dark ages. Most of the people on earth will die and the biggest threat is not surviving with food, water and ammo but medicines which right now they are prescriptions.

While there are many servers where the traditional shoot-on-sight mentality exists, Rust has plenty of havens for those looking for a more civilised lifestyle. You can find player-created towns, complete with attempts at government, trading, and even prisons. It’s one of the nicest reminders that if people pull together and share their resources, fantastic achievements can be made.


Great post,,, I especially like the tip about not storing food you don’t eat, who wants to be in a survival situation and have to eat food they hate… Things will be bad enough… And what about MRE’s or Dehydrated Foods that we have not tried, I got several dehydrated meals that when I tried them one of the meals was so spicy I would die trying to eat it… Taste before you invest in a stockpile of foods.
Think about it this way – are you someone who has insurance of any kind? Health insurance? Life insurance? Home owner’s insurance? If you own any kind of insurance, in a way you’re a “prepper”. You’ve prepared for a specific kind of rare but damaging event by purchasing insurance, so that if that event ever happens, your costs are covered and your suffering is lessened by a payout.
A very detailed and extensive list! But the only problem I have is all the electrical stuff. When we had survival training after qualifying, We were very limited in the tools they gave us, but we managed (basically eating everything we could). When hiking/camping for several days we always have the best experience without bringing any electrical gear.
The bag can be loaded and then cinched down with compression straps to keep your gear from shifting. The bag has 11 different exterior pouches allowing for good organization. The bag comes loaded with PALS webbing which allows any MOLLE webbing accessory to be added. The price point is good since the quality is high and the pack is so large.  The carrying capacity of the bag is 173 liters and comes with a Lifetime Warranty.

For cooking I've got multiple options: I have the Rocket stove which uses any biomass, ie wood, sticks, dried blackberry brambles, pine cones, you name it, it will prolly burn it. I might have to try dried cow patties, I'll bet they'd work too. I have a 3 burner propane stove and a number of portable tanks that would last a few weeksmaybe a month. My latest purchase was a package of kerosene burning appliances, including three different stoves, a high pressure lantern, hurricane lamps, wind-up radio and lights too. Check it out at St Paul Merchantile. Mine should arrive tomorrow. I'm looking forward to trying it out. So, I will set aside about 30 gallons of kerosene for now, but may end up putting in a large below ground tank for longterm storage. 
2)  Check out the LDS (Mormon) site. They sell a limited number of items to non-church members at ridiculously low prices. I’ve purchased rice, beans, wheat, flour and oats from them. I hear they will even let non-members into the “graineries” if you pre-arrange with the local stake. A grainery I hear has a much larger assortment of foods and you do the actual canning of the foodstuffs. The price is reportedly cheaper too. As of this time I haven’t done this but read a blog where a person did and was very impressed with the selection and prices.

We survived and it is amazing how you will also. With just a little prep you will make it. Of course the more you prepare the better it will be. Neighbors close to us were helpful but outside that small group it was bad. People were in line for hours for 1 gallon of gas and it wasn’t pretty. Fights would break out and it was dangerous to be there. No one had gas and that was the number one item stolen.
When faced with unexpected emergencies like a fire, flood, or survival situation, being prepared with the right emergency gear not only ensures you’ll survive, it also means you can do so comfortably. Having the right emergency gear means the difference between having shelter, water, food, first-aid, and warmth during tough times and having nothing to rely on. Our selection of supplies are also the perfect choice for outdoor enthusiasts.
The second aspect of prepping (and some feel this is even more important than the first) is the acquisition of survival knowledge. Feeding your family becomes a lot easier if you know how to hunt or fish, or if you know how to grow or raise your own food. Getting your hands on drinking water is made more challenging if you don’t know how to find safe water in the wild, and if you don’t know how to turn unsafe water into drinkable water. Defending your family against wild animals or dangerous looters is safer if you know how to wield a firearm, have experience with primitive weapons, or know martial arts and self defense. Treating wounds and illnesses is more of a possibility if you can recognize medicinal plants in the wild and know what they can be used for. All of these skills were probably pretty commonplace two hundred years ago, but nowadays most people are woefully under prepared for any kind of true survival situation.
Before we get started, if you just want a list of everything you need to have on hand to be ready for a disaster or emergency situation, here’s our full list of essential emergency supplies to survive any disaster. If you’ve acquired everything on that list, it’s fair to say that you’re officially a prepper, and that you’re ready for most survival scenarios.
Hi, Do not buy land more than 90 miles from where you reside permanently. In the event of discord travel will become impossible, even 90 miles will become almost an unthinkable distance to travel. Plan for the worse case scenario which wont be having a leisurely drive to your hidden bunker. Try and find land that is secluded, has its own underground water supply (a well only costs 5-15 grand to dig) and is remote to suburban living. Above ground living during significant discord will be an impossible survival solution–even out in the boonies. You can purchase steel storage containers (they move cars from Europe to the US in them) which are 40 feet by 10 by 8 for about 3-5K each, You can have land dug out, lay a cement pad and have it craned in for about 10 grand. I can provide you specifics on building if your interested. Dont look for something above ground, unless its just a postal workers strike you and your loved ones will become tagets for non preppers. Good Luck! Im at artofmal@aol.com if you wish to contact me.
There is a LOT of information on the web about what to pack in a bug out bag. You first need to figure out what you’re planning on before you can figure out what to put in your bug out bag. My post on 10 tips how to pack a bug out bag could be one place to start. Also check out this page for some ideas of what to pack that you might not have thought of.
Every bug out bag should be 100% unique. Sure, there are some basic items that every bug out bag should have (food, lighter, water filter, flashlight, etc.), but you should customize your bag based on where you live, what type of disaster is most likely to occur in your area, and how much weight you can carry over a long distance. Many preppers forget about that last point.
Just today I contacted an old acquantaince whom I had been deployed (Army) with previously. I have a great homestead in the country, he has good security skills (I can’t defend my place by myself). We are going to plan on this being his (and his family’s) bug-out location, and I will be surviving in place, with help. So if your family has military, police, etc, type of connections, try those first.
It’s all well and good that you’ve finally realized that there may be cases where you’ll have to leave the house if there’s a flood, fire, earthquake, tornado, or laser attack from Mars, but where will you go and how will you get there? When you’re a beginning prepper, you may not need to go to the extent of having a complete bug out route assessment, but you should have the basics of where you’re going to go.
Great read & outstanding list of items. Extremely helpful & very much appreciated. While I’ve found over the decades that there are usually several ways to accomplish most things, focusing on the core items/goal while adapting to the situations & environment an individual(s) find themselves in is crucial. You can have everything known to man & still have limited skills/experience leaving you vulnerable. You can have all the skills but arrogance & overconfidence can do you in. Applicable intelligence, balance in actions/approach to problem solving on the fly & practice with skills/preps can make the difference in most cases. So one has a 35 year supply of beans and rice, great to have no doubt, but who wouldn’t trade some of it for a coke and some M&Ms for normalcy occasionally? That may be just enough encouragement to get the companions/family through to safety. Again, it’s all a wag for the most part…do what preps you can, develop usable skills…plan, persevere & prevail. Fantastic prep checklist & ideas…thanks! Proverbs 27-17…As iron sharpens iron, so on man sharpens another!
This one is relatively straightforward – air is generally breathable. To plan for a situation where it’s not breathable, you need access to gas masks and plenty of backup filters. You could also consider looking into some kind of air filtration system for your basement, which would essentially turn your basement into a bunker. Our recommendation is to go with the gas masks – while building a true all-scenario bunker is a dream for many preppers, it can be inordinately expensive and time consuming. Here at Secrets of Survival, we understand that while you want to be prepared for all eventualities, you’re also living a full life in the world as it exists today, and it simply doesn’t make sense financially for most people to invest in a fully kitted out all-scenario bunker/bomb shelter.
So many worried about not being Christian like in prepping. My father is poor and prefers it, however if a disaster happened I would go to him lol. You will be surprised to learn how many poor and homeless are more prepared than most of us. That being said you can always start or join a co op, or start your own group that saves extra so when all our preppjng is finally needed we can help out others. Sadly it will be more like two movies…. the book of Eli and cant remember name but about the end of. Humanity after a comet strike or nun war. Sorry don’t remember name.
The most horrifying idea of actual survival is having to do it on your lonesome. That’s exactly what Don’t Starve makes you do, as it’s an entirely solo experience. The terror of having to fend for yourself in the wild is thankfully offset by the lovely Tim Burton-style 2D art, and the collection of utterly bizarre creatures that are lurking in this sepia-tone world. Werepigs, Beargers, Deerclopses, and many more absurd monsters roam the land looking to make things difficult for you.
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