Although most people have enough room to designate a corner of the pantry or an area in the basement for their emergency supplies, there are other options. Assemble or buy a 72-hour survival kit for each member of the family and each pet. Store these items where each family member can grab his or her own in an emergency. Conveniently place these kits in a bedroom closet, on a shelf in the mudroom, or in the trunk of the car. Make sure everyone knows where you have stored the kits, and designate someone to grab kits for pets and young children.
Sheila,  I am in exactly the same position as you.  I am 62, a retired RN, living in a FEMA trailer in a RV park.  All the residents here are full time. I don’t even have a vehicle. Circumstances can be rough, especially with no real income beyond survival expenses.  Can you have a garden?  What about foraging, dehydrating, canning anything that you don’t immediately use. I am including my email. Contact me if you wish.  It seems we may have similar problems but many of the same solutions!  culversonrn@gmail.com

#21 is perhaps the most important and I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone include it before. I know people who subsist entirely on dehydrated and canned food so they’ll be ‘used to eating that way’. This makes no sense to me. Enjoy fresh, healthy food while it’s available. This will keep you in better health and more prepared to handle something unexpected. Also, plan for what to do after the storage runs out. Keep a garden now, consider keeping backyard chickens, etc.. work towards learning to make your own cheese, jerky and bread.
The most important factor that will determine the right size bug out bag is your torso size. You can measure your torso by having a friend or casual acquaintance measure the distance from the top of your Iliac Crest (hip bones) up to the bony prominence at the base of your neck (the last cervical vertebrae). Knowing the length of your torso will help you choose a bug out bag that fits comfortably.
Additionallly, I’ve added a number of firearms, including a handgun, an AR 15 with optics and  at least 900 rounds for each. I also have an older 30-06 with a scope for which I have a bit of ammo. I’ve practiced with each of these weapons to tha point where I’m proficient. I’m no sniper, but can definitely hit < 4" groups with the handgun at appropriate distances and better groups with the battle rifle and the '06 at 100 yds.

Great post,,, I especially like the tip about not storing food you don’t eat, who wants to be in a survival situation and have to eat food they hate… Things will be bad enough… And what about MRE’s or Dehydrated Foods that we have not tried, I got several dehydrated meals that when I tried them one of the meals was so spicy I would die trying to eat it… Taste before you invest in a stockpile of foods.
Keep it SIMPLE – you are not trying to build a mobile home that you will carry around. Many sites list dozens and dozens of items to buy and bring, adding cost and weight.  Remember that electronics need power and are prone to breaking.  Pack simple, reliable, things to cover your basic needs.  Check out our Free Bug Out Bag Planning Tool to plan what you want to include and see how your items will affect the overall weight of your pack.
The whole process of creating new tools is mostly done using a sophisticated 3D-printer available from the start of the game. You gather various resources and transform them to create tools that you will need for your survival. For example, organic matter gets printed into raw carbon, combine carbon with some zinc and you get a battery; combine that battery with some glass and you get a flashlight that helps you see in the dark. It's very straightforward but incredibly satisfying when you build your tools, especially since you are doing all of this while swimming in an ocean filled with predators. See More
Pack things that make you self-sufficient – if you are thinking about an item that you will need to pair with something that you are going to need to source on the way, forget it.  If you are moving to safety, the last thing you want to do is worry about scavenging.  Pack complementary and multi-purpose items that can be used both individually and together to save space.
A good read and a very good list to ‘pick and chose’ from – I try to carry ‘multi-person items as much as possible – cuts down on the weight – as a ‘senior citizen’ the packs I carried years ago I can’t carry now so I have to make changes that match my physical ability – Also a good idea on up-dating – at least every three months or seasonal (which also changes pack size and contents) Lastly, don’t just put a bag together – take a weekend and use it occasionally – carry it distances in different terrain – make sure you have the physical stamina to bear the load – it’s useless if you can’t ‘take it with you’..
There are many choices of packs out there that would make a good Bug Out Bag. In the end, the important thing to keep in mind is your personal preference. Bigger doesn’t always mean better when it comes to selecting the right bug out bag. Remember that a Bug Out Bag is recommended to store 3 days worth of rations, water, and gear in a survival situation.
That’s why temperature regulation is so important – and when it comes to regulating temperature in a survival scenario, other than having a roof over your head as shade, there’s nothing more reliable or traditional as fire. That’s why it’s exceedingly important that you have the right materials and equipment on hand to be able to start a fire even in wet conditions. Sure, some people can build fires without equipment, and that’s definitely a useful skill to have – but we strongly recommend you just go ahead and stock up on the resources that make fire building easy. After all, in a disaster situation, you don’t want to make anything more difficult than it needs to be. Having stockpiles for fire-making is even more essential for those of you who live in areas that get colder… but remember, anything under 70 F is already cold for humans, so even if you live in a region with pretty temperate weather, it still probably makes sense to make sure you have everything you need to make your shelter comfortable.
Our assortment of fun survival games present new and interesting challenges in every arena. In certain titles, all you have to do is stay alive. Other games require your to slay every monster in sight. Grab a deadly weapon, and defend yourself against a seemingly endless barrage of enemies! Survive the night in a haunted labyrinth. Be wary of demons, monsters, and otherworldly creatures who want to feast upon you!
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