But the more I research about preppers and prepping (I had to cause I have a school project about it), I realize I am actually not so different from them (in terms of mindset, not so much action. Because I can’t do anything except learn skills and mentally prepare). Even my most open minded classmates regard to them as nutters, and that was the focus of the project for most of my peers, focus on how crazy preppers are, how delusional or mental, but the fact is… as how I see it… preppers aren’t delusional, they are REALISTIC and PRACTICAL!
For now I am planning on bugging-in in the suburbs while maintaining the ability to quickly bug-out if necessary. I am considering buying an isolated piece of property that would still be reached within a two day hike if necessary. Once I find that property I'll plan accordingly and stock some thing there with the plan of bugging-out sooner rather than later.
If I could ask a stupid question… I’m planning on immigrating from the US to the UK where some laws are different for preppers. Things that I have here, such as my machete and combat/survival knives are illegal there. As are most firearms without extensive registering and licensing and I’m sure those few with real firearms are on a list there. And likely new immigrants are prohibited from owning firearms and most weapons in general. I also have a future wife and two children there to consider. I’m ex military and martial artist but they aren’t and I want them to be able to get prepared asap. Any suggestions? Thank you immensely for this information and for educating beginner preppers. Contrary to some posts here, many of these items, while perhaps not necessary, can make the difference between life and death or worse the deaths of loved ones. Vaseline, duct and electricical tape, socks, gloves, cotton, fishing gear, strong paracord, and much more have a wide myriad of uses. Also I would suggest getting at least basic military field medical training to treat cuts, infections, GSWs (gunshot wounds), etc. One strong suggestion, I personally would add various sized plastic Ziploc type bags and at least a couple of contractor trash bags. These are indispensable. They can help with distilling water with a solar still in even a post nuke environment, with Vaseline can patch a sucking chest wound, can keep your documents, phone and other paper or electronic equipment dry, etc… In addition, know your surroundings, what’s available, and LEARN TO IMPROVISE. Learn to make a firebow, what wood types in your environment are best, how to make your own fishhooks or fishing spear from wood or bone or scrap metal, etc. A small saw is indispensable. I also have a leatherman tool and a couple of different sized pliers as well as wire cutters and a small coil of wire…which also has a myriad of uses from securing any blade to a handle or shaft to making fish hooks, to even crafting various boobytraps and snares. Be vigilant, know your surroundings and common things and locations you see daily. Make mental note. Learn to braid paracord. Or martial arts. Your most valuable resources you can ever have are your mind and body, keep them honed and healthy and continue to learn and perfect your craft. One last note: nearly anything is possible with the right knowledge. Best wishes to all reading this. ♡
That’s true, we do. It’s clear that we can’t carry everything to survive for a year or more on our backs and we count on our stash at point B. If it’s not there, we do the best we can, go to a FEMA camp or die. What are our alternatives? I think that most people will go to point B if they see the problem before it arrives (hurricane) but a surprise nuclear attack on Houston (in my case) would necessitate a quick exit along with everyone else still alive. As to ‘bring it’, I certainly would if a. I had an operational vehicle and b. the roads were clear enough to get around minor obstacles – I don’t and won’t have a two ton or half track at my disposal. If not of if my vehicle becomes untenable along the way, I’ll put on my boots and my BOB and do the best I can. As you say, there are many scenarios.
Ark isn’t just the best dinosaur survival game you can buy, it’s arguably one of the greatest dinosaur games ever made. After all, prehistoric beasties make everything better. It’s a survival game that fills every edge of the template: punch trees to get wood, use wood to build shelter, kill animals to find food, inevitably die because you forgot to drink water. Yet Ark transcends the typical survival game pattern by including leathery leviathans that both want to hunt and eat you, but with some perseverance, you can also tame and ride. What’s more, cold wars rage between mega tribes as they seek dominance over their world. Master builders push the limits of creation in a survival game. Dedicated players rack up years of playtime.

In a genuine disaster, having a safe shelter and a stockpile of food and water is a huge advantage – but only as long as you can prevent others from forcibly taking what’s yours. When people are desperate, they’ll do anything to survive, and that includes attacking those who have the means of survival. Being properly prepared involves having the means and the will to protect yourself when necessary. Any prepper worth their salt should be armed in some way – with firearms, or at the very least non-lethal weapons or primitive weapons. Having some understanding of survival self defense is also a good idea.
The list of possible areas of interest and the related skills that you can pick up are endless, and almost all of them could prove useful. Being a prepping doesn’t just mean having a huge stockpile off food in your basement – it can be a lot more than that, and go in almost any direction you like. Essentially, if your hobbies or interests could prove useful in a disaster situation, then you can apply that to your prepping by simply changing your frame of mind – instead of purely thinking about something as ‘I’m doing this for fun”, think about it also as ‘I’m doing this to arm myself with a new and useful survival skill”
Frostpunk takes place in a steampunk-themed 1886 England. A freak snowstorm has wiped out most of the world's population and plunged Earth into a deep freeze. As the last remaining bastion of humanity, you'll be building and managing an outpost as you fight the weather and human nature itself. It's out of this dark and desolate post-apocalyptic premise that allows the game to offer a lot of grim, yet interesting gameplay choices. See More
If you prefer building, creative mode is the way to go. It immediately gives you unlimited blocks, the ability to fly, and immortality. This allows you to easily build anything you want without worrying about height or enemies. Things like giant castles, villages, roller coasters, and even unique builds such as the Enterprise from Star Trek. You can really let your creativity loose. See More
2)  Check out the LDS (Mormon) site. They sell a limited number of items to non-church members at ridiculously low prices. I’ve purchased rice, beans, wheat, flour and oats from them. I hear they will even let non-members into the “graineries” if you pre-arrange with the local stake. A grainery I hear has a much larger assortment of foods and you do the actual canning of the foodstuffs. The price is reportedly cheaper too. As of this time I haven’t done this but read a blog where a person did and was very impressed with the selection and prices.
When loaded and put on properly, your hips should carry the bulk of your pack’s weight. Because of this, extra padding in the hip belt can make a lot of difference. However, you should also make sure the hip belt isn’t so bulky that it ends up rubbing your hip bones or ribs uncomfortably. In an ideal world, your bug out bag’s hip belt should fit comfortably between the top of your hip bones and the bottom of your lowest ribs. 
Astroneer is one of the best games to come from Steam’s Early Access platform: solid at launch, but transformed into something truly special after two years of consistent content updates and polishing. In Astroneer you crash land on an alien planet and carve out an existence by developing your life support pod into a fully fledged base replete with vehicles, power sources, and laboratories. Of course, as in all the best survival games, you’ll need a lot of resources to start building the best base modules, and to do that you’ll need to explore your planet hoovering up rare crafting materials and shaping the terrain to unearth resource-rich caverns.

More importantly, though, the way you survive in Minecraft is entirely up to you. You could build an elaborate fortress and play a defence-style game, fending off the creatures of the night. Or you could craft exciting weaponry and venture out into the most dangerous zones of the world, testing both your mettle and metal. The world is literally endless and filled with amazing natural wonders just begging to be explored. Just remember to eat something every now and again, and you’ll be fine.
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