A very detailed and extensive list! But the only problem I have is all the electrical stuff. When we had survival training after qualifying, We were very limited in the tools they gave us, but we managed (basically eating everything we could). When hiking/camping for several days we always have the best experience without bringing any electrical gear.
It wasn’t that long ago – only a few decades ago – when we were in a cold war with Russia and there was a very real possibility of a nuclear war. It isn’t that difficult to envision a new cold war with China in the coming decades, or an increase in tensions or even an all-out war with North Korea. Not to mention the dicey relationships that the USA and the west in general have with Iran, Russia, Pakistan, and a number of other countries – all of whom have or are developing a nuclear arsenal. That’s just talking about nuclear war. What about a conventional war, or terrorist attacks?
I like your addition of a bug net. One thing I noticed is that the author correctly says to save space and weight to just pack a tarp. However, where I live, from late May to late September if you don’t pack bug netting, a tent with screens or plenty of bug spray you are going to be itchy, sore and tired from no sleep because you are up all night swatting mosquitoes
Build Quality – The last thing you want is to be trudging through the windswept landscape trying to escape the oncoming storm surge and have your pack split open and spill your survival gear all over the place. The bug out bag should be made of durable, water resistant nylon and have high quality zippers (waterproof if possible) and double stitching all around. The shoulder straps should be firmly affixed to the bag and be well padded to help absorb the load you’re carrying. And if there’s a waist strap it too should be well-padded and preferably adjustable to accommodate people of different heights.
The GR1 is a USA made backpack made to Armed Forces specs but with a civilian friendly design. The pack is a favorite among travelers, military personnel, law enforcement, hikers, emergency preppers, students, and of course GORUCK Challenge participants. This pack was specifically built for the Special Forces and has been used in Baghdad and New York City.(2)
Skills don’t weigh nuthin. Get it into your head right now that it would be better to know how to make something out of scrap you find than it would to carry it. with enough knowlege, you could get dropped off into the middle of the woods naked and still be able to survive. Sounds kind of fun, actually. Maybe a little painful. Drill, drill, drill. A big part of preparation is rehearsal. Special Forces units practice for months for operations; you should too.
Once you’ve gotten some idea of what you need to do and how to do it, you really need to sit down and make an overall plan. This is kind of like making an outline for a book or story. This is where you’ll list any plans you have or things you still need to do in general terms. You should be continually updating this overall emergency plan. It should be in one place (or exact copies) that anyone in the family will know where it is to grab. I’d keep it in a binder at the house and some kind of copy in your bug out bag. Digital backups are always a good idea but don’t make it your only method.
Terraria uses a bright color palette and an upbeat chiptune soundtrack to ease you into its world. However, once you start exploring and spend time in it you'll notice it's not as cozy as it first seemed to be. Blood Moons that rouse the dead from their graves. Goblin armies trying to destroy everything in their wake. Vast and dark cave systems, filled with odd creatures and various dangers. Ancient ruins, teeming with the restless dead and evil spirits. Pockets of decaying land, thriving with misshapen monstrosities. It's really fun to explore and discover something new about the world of Terraria. See More
Great read & outstanding list of items. Extremely helpful & very much appreciated. While I’ve found over the decades that there are usually several ways to accomplish most things, focusing on the core items/goal while adapting to the situations & environment an individual(s) find themselves in is crucial. You can have everything known to man & still have limited skills/experience leaving you vulnerable. You can have all the skills but arrogance & overconfidence can do you in. Applicable intelligence, balance in actions/approach to problem solving on the fly & practice with skills/preps can make the difference in most cases. So one has a 35 year supply of beans and rice, great to have no doubt, but who wouldn’t trade some of it for a coke and some M&Ms for normalcy occasionally? That may be just enough encouragement to get the companions/family through to safety. Again, it’s all a wag for the most part…do what preps you can, develop usable skills…plan, persevere & prevail. Fantastic prep checklist & ideas…thanks! Proverbs 27-17…As iron sharpens iron, so on man sharpens another!

The long and the short of it is that the world is in more danger that it seems. Everything that we see as ‘normal’ could be wiped out of existence at any time – or we could go another 200 years without seeing the type of disaster that we’re prepping for. However, the risk always exist, and preppers are just people who recognize that risk and have made appropriate preparations to protect their homes and their families in case a large scale disaster ever actually happens.
Packing a bug out bag can seem overwhelming as the task of not forgetting something important can be daunting. There are many checklists out there that will tell you the essential items you should always keep in your bug out bag. You can buy an already packed Bug out Bag, like this one here- Urban Survival Bug Out Bag, which contains essentials items like food, water, and a first aid kit. You can also check out our Bug Out Bag Checklist and personalize your bag yourself.
It’s an impressive lineup – did we mention the 2 person tents? – that, like many of its competing bug out bags, is light on food. Although there’s plenty of room in the heavy duty nylon backpack for all the food you’ll need to survive several days in the wild. The company advertises their bag as being ‘discreet’, which is their way of saying others won’t recognize that it’s full of high quality survival gear and try to steal it from you. That may very well be but if Hurricane Harvey is bearing down on your location you have bigger things to worry about. The 2 person tent we mentioned is minimalist in nature but will provide welcome shelter if you can find a dry place to set it up and the waterproof backpack cover that comes with the bug out kit is a major plus this bug out bag has over some of the competition. The Stealth Tactical bug out bag costs a little more but it’s ready for whatever comes.
Keep it SIMPLE – you are not trying to build a mobile home that you will carry around. Many sites list dozens and dozens of items to buy and bring, adding cost and weight.  Remember that electronics need power and are prone to breaking.  Pack simple, reliable, things to cover your basic needs.  Check out our Free Bug Out Bag Planning Tool to plan what you want to include and see how your items will affect the overall weight of your pack.
At the most basic level, the word prepping is simply short for “preparing” or “preparation”, but in modern usage it’s come to be associated specifically with preparations for large scale disasters and catastrophes. Things as common as stocking up on a canned goods in anticipation of a major storm, or having a good first-aid kit around the house could be described as a type of prepping, but it could also go much further than that.
I love the post, and the comments… heck the entire site is ingenious. If I could make a tiny contribution it would be the ICSB kit. It’s something I took away from my earliest days in LRS. It’s true that we seem to have kits within kits (hygiene kit, med kit, fishing kit all packed into a bug out kit) but it’s a handy way of compartmentalising our kit for quick access. Being able to access things quickly quietly and sometimes in the dark can be a lifesaver. So I offer up the ICSB kit. Stands for In Case S#$& Breaks. Some of the items are already on your lists but it’s nice to have them all in the same place when something breaks at the least opportune time. It’s a little pouch with duct tape, bailing wire, super glue, safety pins. Zip ties, key rings, buttons, carpet thread, twine, and anything else that is small and fits into this category. Anyway, that’s my two bits. Thanks for all the good info.
On another note, the only thing I had trouble with was #1. Yes, sleeping bags are big and fat and are a pain to carry, but they will make up for it in heat. You need that heat, at least here in the Pacific Northwest where I live. You use a space blanket or bivvy, you get either a miserable night (lucky), or hypothermia (normal). I wouldn’t mind packing a bivvy instead if I lived in a warmer climate, but seriously, don’t skimp on the sleeping bag.
Plastic is a tricky thing. Clear hard plastic jugs like from companies like…Crystal Geyser, Alhambra etc. Are better for storing water in as far as plastic goes. The foggy white “milk Jug” style will break down fast and sadly leak in your cupboards. IF that is all you can get, I suggest storing in the garage or a place with good flooring and maybe even put into garbage bag in case.
Hi, Ive been prepping for 5 years now. Ive learned many of the pitfalls and pipe dreams of preppers the hard way. I have alot of info on prepping–things I thought were basic knowledge but I find are actually useful to other preppers and I am more than happy to share any and all sources from building a bunker (for less than 20K) to suppliers of food, water (WIse is great by the way) to how to obtain meds to medical training in a wilderness setting and books that are also helpful and good quik reference. If you have a question please write me and I will do my best to answer it. Artofmal@aol.com. I am not a professional in the prepping industry, just an average joe who doesnt want to end up with no options which many will have to endure. Best of luck to everyone.
Great post,,, I especially like the tip about not storing food you don’t eat, who wants to be in a survival situation and have to eat food they hate… Things will be bad enough… And what about MRE’s or Dehydrated Foods that we have not tried, I got several dehydrated meals that when I tried them one of the meals was so spicy I would die trying to eat it… Taste before you invest in a stockpile of foods.
Each new world is randomly generated, making for a different experience every time. There can be plains, rivers, beaches, ravines, giant mountains, hidden villages, and a lot more. There are also 38 biomes, which includes snow, desert, forest, swamp among others. Each one has its own set of unique blocks, plant life, and creatures. You won't get tired of exploring above ground or underground because every location will seem new and exciting. See More
Some of the key survival skills that we think every prepper needs to know include things like building emergency bags (learning how to put together both a get home bag and a bug out bag are pretty essential skills). Knowing how to live off the land or what to do in a home invasion, and how to make a torch are just some of the wide range of survival skills that are covered in the section, so make sure you check it out.
I too live in a remote Alaskan location. I am facing the same dilema with the livestock concern. Heating a building year round just to keep your chickens alive sure does not seem appealing. I would however, recommend you getting fishing nets to catch “bulk” fish in the summer and since you have solar panels, and an extra freezer to store the fish in to get through the winter. I also have an ice auger and tip ups for winter time fishing. As far as medical kits, I have an extensive one to say the least. It contains everything needed to perform any type of minor surgery and some major surgery operations. Sutures, staple kits, scapels and TONS of gauze and pain medication!! Also dental kits and means to repair broken caps or teeth. Good luck to you, sounds as if you are doing very well in your setup =)
Those of us who live in the developed world often forget how important clean water is to survival, probably because most of us have access to virtually unlimited amounts of safe drinking water for free. People who live in developing countries on the hand value clean water immensely, and in a disaster scenario, it’s very possible that you will also need to adopt this mindset in order to survive for longer than a couple of days.
I’m a single mother of a (almost 5 year old), I live with my parents on a 9.5 acre ranch about 45 minutes to an hour North-West of the heart of Houston Texas and one of my greatest concerns are hurricanes. My parents grew up close to the border of Louisiana, they have survived several hurricanes by either purchasing a 3-5 day supply of survival goods & riding out the storm OR by evacuating. Since we live out here my families first choice is ALWAYS hunkering down & riding out the storm (while its scary during the storm, I prefer this choice because we are home, we can begin repairs immediately as well as defend our home from criminals targeting victims who felt evacuating was necessary) My dad wants to purchase a Generator and thinks that this is prepping. Short-term this is fine however, I remember when Katrina hit New Orleans and then Ike hit Galveston/Houston, our roads were clogged with people evacuating, Gas stations were out of Gas and still crowded, people were scared & nervous, tensions were high… needless to say on both occasions it was scary. I want to prep Not only for hurricanes but just about anything that can and most likely will turn the unprepared hords of people into Mobs that are scared and desperate. Ive tried talking to my parents about the importance of preparing for a natural event and/or any other cataclysmic event that would cause this to happen, and what we should do to prevent our family from becoming victims not only from what could happen but from the people but my parents think that buying a generator and filling a plastic Rubbermaid storage bin with what the National Hurricane Center suggests to prepare for hurricane season is good enough. They have mentioned how it’s not likely that anything is going to happen (personally I feel that it’s arrogant to say that nothing will happen… Something is EVENTUALLY going to happen) and we shouldn’t be worried because we do have weapons to defend ourselves (but no ammo… cuz that’s so useful) and we have some land so we can just grow vegetables get a cow and become self reliant (with is good but without practice and preps we won’t last a week… plus, where are you going to get a cow when everyone is freaking out?) They have also mentioned before that my “ambitious” thoughts for prepping is expensive and time consuming… my thought on cutting cost is that we have tons of stuff around our ranch that we don’t use, that we could sell and use the money for our preps, and the space that is being occupied with this “stuff” is where I want to keep my preps. MY question is, how do I convince my parents that we need to prepare for self reliance in the event of a hurricane (or series of hurricanes in one season) or any other event? And if I can’t convince my parents to start prepping with me, what can I do to start prepping that will also help my parents start prepping? My mom grew up learning how to make preserves & other homemade canned goods, should I ask her to teach me? I have been reading articles and learning on how to prep, what we need, our food/water preps as well as replenishment, what to do, where to go (if we have to bug-out) ect. but it seems like I can’t get my plan up & off the ground without my parents (or at least their support). I believe that being self reliant is important however being on a 9.5 acre ranch with my mother, father, daughter and sister, my family is my community, they are the people that I will need in tough times and the only ones I will be able to trust, they are also the reason why I want to start prepping. So any advice, information or help that anyone has to offer would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much!
The first thing to do to ensure that you have access to clean water is to stockpile it. An average person needs about a half gallon a day of drinking water, so for a family of four, you need 2 gallons of water a day. FEMA recommends that you store up to three days worth of water to deal with shortages and such, but as preppers, we’re planning for scenarios that go beyond the typical natural disasters you see. We recommend having a stockpile of at least 2 weeks worth of water, which means you should have about 28 gallons of water stored at any given time.
Another zombie survival game that’s been in Early Access since a week after Nelson Mandela died, 7 Days To Die and DayZ aren’t a million miles away from each other but it’s 7 Days that arguably has the most interesting ideas. You survive for as long as you can against hordes of the undead by building fortifications and jankily bashing their heads in.
My husband and I have just started prepping and I can’t read enough information on what we should be doing to prepare. Our biggest questions seem to be about where to find a safe place to go. We live in Ohio right now but plan on moving to Tennessee (Cumberland area) in 3 years. I’ve read a little about the area but I’m not really convinced this is a safe area to stay. Anyone’s thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Did you know that most people in the United States have less than 2 weeks of food stored in their home?!  If this includes you, it’s time to make a change!  Take a look at your food supplies and estimate how long you could survive on it – for most beginners it’s pretty scary!   Your first goal with food should be to have 1 month worth of meals stored, immediately after that you’re going to get 3 months worth as quickly as possible.  Here is a great place to learn about storing your own food.  Some additional fantastic resources for Food Storage are Everyday Food Storage and Food Storage Made Easy.
If you’re content with fighting against disease, bodily functions, and zombies who occasionally phase through walls, you’ll get to DayZ’s best feature: exploration. The world of Chernarus is a Soviet wasteland, and Bohemia has captured that Eastern Bloc atmosphere with the towns and villages around the map. DayZ’s forests feel genuinely life-like rather than being man-made imitations, while there’s a true sense of isolation out in the wilderness.
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