There is a delicate balance between exploring and surviving, and every aspect of gameplay is closely related. The amount of activity the player performs and the distance they can travel and explore, are balanced around certain metrics such as time, warmth, and calories - and all of these game systems are closely related resulting in a finely tuned experience. For example, eating food replenishes calories, but in order to find food, you have to explore and salvage which causes you to burn calories in the first place. The player must watch how many calories they burn, even when sleeping, and make sure they find or hunt enough food to keep themselves going. On top of this, the player needs to seek shelter from the cold, make sure they are wearing the appropriate clothing, and build fires to stay warm and cook food. During your explorations to salvage supplies and look for food items, you will need to explore carefully as to not get stuck without a place to sleep for the night. See More
I lived through hurricane Katrina. Katrina really hit Mississippi not New Orleans. Where as NO flooded we had entire towns gone, nothing left not even debris as it floated out to sea. I lived about 30 minutes inland and lost part of my roof, my pump house, 2 acres of fence and about 50 trees. We had no electricity for 3 months and no phone service for 6 months. I had NO clue how to survive but my father was with us and really helped out.

Thank you for writing this. We have been preppers for over 13 years. Some people made fun of us when we first moved out to the country home we have when they found out. Then we all got snowed in for 2 weeks. No power, no nuthing. After only 2 days people started to flock to our door. I will NEVER tell another soul that I have saplies ever again. It turned into a mad house. Thankfuly, most of them have started to prep now to. They learned from us that it is better to have your own.
There is a LOT of information on the web about what to pack in a bug out bag. You first need to figure out what you’re planning on before you can figure out what to put in your bug out bag. My post on 10 tips how to pack a bug out bag could be one place to start. Also check out this page for some ideas of what to pack that you might not have thought of.
Some advice please; I am a single male 45 years old living on a fixed income because of brain cancer surgery and subsequent treatment left me with seizures. My 3 children are grown now and am serious about prepping for any disaster, especially since I live in tornado ally. So far the only thing I have done is to stock 6 months worth of my Rx medicine which I do rotate monthly so they don’t expire. After reviewing my budget I have around $150 of disposable income a month. How would I begin? Does anyone have any advice? Thanks.
Great article on getting started. I began my prepping journey a little over a year ago starting in a little different order. My first prepping item purchase was a firearm, specifically a semi-automatic 12 gauge shotgun. I’ve since amassed ammo in various shot sizes for it as well as slugs. All with the idea in mind to use it for self defense and hunting; birds, rabbits, possibly blacktail deer. 
There is a LOT of information on the web about what to pack in a bug out bag. You first need to figure out what you’re planning on before you can figure out what to put in your bug out bag. My post on 10 tips how to pack a bug out bag could be one place to start. Also check out this page for some ideas of what to pack that you might not have thought of.

In our current economic environment, prices continue to rise. The best time to start investing in your family’s health and safety is now. By making a list of necessities and gradually stocking your survival storage pantry now, you can take advantage of discounts and special pricing. Be proactive. Minimize rotation expenses by choosing supplies with a longer shelf life.

Jim BAs far as cheese goes. It is ok to pack away poredwed stuff. Light wieght and cheap. But not too healthy.If you really want to pack away cheese, do it the old fashion way. Buy wheels of hard cheese (the harder the longer it last) cover them with cheesewax, (you can easily do this at home) several coats. Hang the cheese in a net in a cool dry place. 20 years shelf life.
Sheila,  I am in exactly the same position as you.  I am 62, a retired RN, living in a FEMA trailer in a RV park.  All the residents here are full time. I don’t even have a vehicle. Circumstances can be rough, especially with no real income beyond survival expenses.  Can you have a garden?  What about foraging, dehydrating, canning anything that you don’t immediately use. I am including my email. Contact me if you wish.  It seems we may have similar problems but many of the same solutions!  culversonrn@gmail.com
Jim BI have been prepping for a few years now. The first thing I think sooemne should do as far as food is pack away rice and beans. These combine for a complete protein which is essential for prepping. I have rice and beans packed into mylar bags and 5 gal buckets with O2 absorbers. They last 25-30 years on the shelf.(see Brigham Young’s research into shelf lives of dried food) It is very easy and not too expensive to pack away months worth of rice and beans that you will not have to rotate. Pasta, oats, sugar, can also be packed this way and last up to 30 years. Most serious preppers with families have hundreds of pounds of ric e and beans packed away in buckets. Rice and beans should be a staple of every food preppers plan. Healthy, incredibly long shelf life, filling, cheap.A great idea for emergency rice is to cook your rice. Then put it into a food dehydrator, dehydrate it completely. Then pack away in a mylar bag. When needed you open it up and it does not need to be cooked, only rehydrated. You can pour cold water on it if you need to and let it soak. That way of you are unable to get water boiling for whatever reason, you could still have some rice to eat. Or if you are trying to conserve fuel, just get the water a little warm and pour it on the dehydrated rice. Much less fuel use then boiling the rice. Mountain House sells this in #10 cans but it is cheaper to make your self.You can also dehydrate frozen vegies and pack them away in vacuum seal bags with o2 absorbers and they will last 8-10 years. I can give you links to good web sites if you need to learn how to do anyu of this.
How to Make a Bug Out Bag? – If you decide to make your own bug out bag you’ll want to start with a good-sized, water-resistant backpack and then fill it with a combination of food and practical implements that will allow you to transcend any difficulties you’re likely to encounter. You’ll want to include purified water as well as a water filter (in case the emergency has fouled the local water supply), plenty of freeze dried food along with power bars (but no perishables) and things you can use to protect yourself from the wind, cold and any precipitation that may be falling. Which means you’ll want emergency blankets, dry clothes and rain ponchos. You’ll also want to include other practical implements like a compass, tactical flashlight, walkie talkies, multi tool and more.
What makes it stand out among its peers is an incredibly fastidious metabolism system which makes Scum a sort of simulation game that fully tracks what you eat, drink, and excrete. Eat many more calories than you’re burning off and you’ll get fatter, eat less than what you’re burning off and you’ll have no energy and gradually lose weight. But it’s a lot more complicated than that: you’ll have to watch your vitamin levels, stomach, intestine, bladder, and colon volume, and ensure that you eat well in advance of needing energy as it takes time for your body to process anything you put into it. Scum puts the hunger and thirst mechanics of other survival games to shame. There are rewards for taking care of your body, too, as a fitter characters deal more melee damage, run faster, and possess better weapon handling than their emaciated or overweight counterparts.
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