The most horrifying idea of actual survival is having to do it on your lonesome. That’s exactly what Don’t Starve makes you do, as it’s an entirely solo experience. The terror of having to fend for yourself in the wild is thankfully offset by the lovely Tim Burton-style 2D art, and the collection of utterly bizarre creatures that are lurking in this sepia-tone world. Werepigs, Beargers, Deerclopses, and many more absurd monsters roam the land looking to make things difficult for you.
Terraria uses a bright color palette and an upbeat chiptune soundtrack to ease you into its world. However, once you start exploring and spend time in it you'll notice it's not as cozy as it first seemed to be. Blood Moons that rouse the dead from their graves. Goblin armies trying to destroy everything in their wake. Vast and dark cave systems, filled with odd creatures and various dangers. Ancient ruins, teeming with the restless dead and evil spirits. Pockets of decaying land, thriving with misshapen monstrosities. It's really fun to explore and discover something new about the world of Terraria. See More
So despite the impression many people got from my “50 Items” article, I don’t think you should pack your bug out bag with as many items as possible. In fact, I think you should check your bag for any non-essential items with a large weight-to-space ratio and remove them. To that end, here’s a list of survival items I’ve seen in various lists online that, in my opinion, you don’t really need in your bug out bag.
Keep in mind, a well-designed bug out bag should weigh no more than 25% of your body weight, assuming you are in average physical condition and are not overweight. Any heavier than that can make carrying the bag highly strenuous and limit your ability to remain mobile and travel long distances on foot during an evacuation. Limit your packing list to the essentials that will help you survive.
Astroneer isn’t quite as bleak as most other survival games, despite being just as treacherous. There’s a gorgeous low-poly art style that promises to soothe you as you crest every new horizon, and then there’s the fact that you can have your pals join you at any time thanks to drop-in/drop-out co-op. There’s a sense of progression in Astroneer, too, as you can eventually blast off and start colonising the other six planets in your solar system, providing tangible goals for you to work towards rather than mere existence.
It’s an attitude of awareness about the fragility of  stability (and of human life), and an understanding of the importance of being properly prepared, just in case society takes a turn for the worst. It’s about being willing to learn new skills that may not seem useful and important to your life right now, because they may prove to be life-saving in a different kind of life (and also because learning survival skills is fun).
Terraria uses a bright color palette and an upbeat chiptune soundtrack to ease you into its world. However, once you start exploring and spend time in it you'll notice it's not as cozy as it first seemed to be. Blood Moons that rouse the dead from their graves. Goblin armies trying to destroy everything in their wake. Vast and dark cave systems, filled with odd creatures and various dangers. Ancient ruins, teeming with the restless dead and evil spirits. Pockets of decaying land, thriving with misshapen monstrosities. It's really fun to explore and discover something new about the world of Terraria. See More
What about natural disasters, like hurricanes, or earthquakes, or floods? Surely we’ve all noticed the increase in large scale natural disasters that we’ve been experiencing. How about the possibility of a global pandemic similar to the Spanish Flu (which killed 50 million people, one third of the world’s population at the time). In a Spanish Flu scenario, more than 2 billion people could die – what kind of impact would this have on our normal lives, on the economy and society as a whole? Scientists are increasingly worried about these so-called super viruses and anti-biotic resistant bacteria that are highly resistant to treatment. All it takes is one of these diseases to become both highly resistant and highly infectious/contagious and we could be talking about a death toll not in the millions, but in the billions. In this situation, would we still have electricity? Would stores stay open? Would the food supply that we’ve come to rely on still function the same? Nobody can truly answer these kinds of questions, and that’s why prepping is important.
Just today I contacted an old acquantaince whom I had been deployed (Army) with previously. I have a great homestead in the country, he has good security skills (I can’t defend my place by myself). We are going to plan on this being his (and his family’s) bug-out location, and I will be surviving in place, with help. So if your family has military, police, etc, type of connections, try those first.
Once you’ve got basic stockpiles and plans for meeting all of your basic survival needs, you can move on to skill acquisition. This is where you go from the basics to becoming a certain “type” of prepper. We’ve already gone over some of the skills relevant to shelters, food, and water, but there are a huge variety of useful skills and knowledge that you can pick up that might come in handy in a true disaster scenario. Make sure you check out our survival skills section – pick and choose the things that interest you the most.
An excellent resource regarding bug out bags is a new book by Max Cooper called, “Realistic Bug Out Bag, 2nd Edition: Prepared to Survive.” This is a monster book at over 600+ pages. It has scenarios, drills, and is full of useful and insightful information. I like that the author stresses planning and has a section devoted to bug out plans and how to practice & train your plan. He is also a huge advocate of designing a BOB that fits your needs based on factors that pertain to your situation. I highly recommend this book.
The list of possible areas of interest and the related skills that you can pick up are endless, and almost all of them could prove useful. Being a prepping doesn’t just mean having a huge stockpile off food in your basement – it can be a lot more than that, and go in almost any direction you like. Essentially, if your hobbies or interests could prove useful in a disaster situation, then you can apply that to your prepping by simply changing your frame of mind – instead of purely thinking about something as ‘I’m doing this for fun”, think about it also as ‘I’m doing this to arm myself with a new and useful survival skill”
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I agree less is more. Use two contractor refuse bags sandwiched together with leaves and moss in between the layers will make a good sleeping bag, floats for river crossings.water storage etc. Not so detectable on ir, properly camouflaged. Thermal a whole different story. The Oath Keepers site has instructions for a thermal evasion cloak. With a little bit of tweaking it will make a very warm and snug sleeping bag. So if evasion from thermal is a concern this might be a solution. It can be used as poncho, lean to, and rain fly. For survival needs I carry .22 with subsonic 1000 fps thereabouts and a silencer. The sound signature is that of a click of the firing pin. For motion detection $ 9.99 motion detector from Harbor Freight, they come in white, mask and and paint black avoiding the white detector cover.
Plan your bag with a defined time period in mind.  72 hours is a good starting point as this is approximately how long a person can survive without water.  Once you start planning for weeks out you will have added too many complications to your list of Bug Out Bag essentials.  Have a look at our post on Making a Bug Out Plan to see what you need to consider as a part of your survival preparedness.
We actually have an entire section on the site dedicated to the steps you need to take to cover your basic needs as dictated by the survival rule of three – food, water, and shelter (and breathable air). It covers all the survival skills and knowledge relevant to self sufficiency in these areas. If your goal is to go beyond being a prepper and you want to be a true survival expert, definitely check out that section of the site and read everything you’re able to.

Don't Starve is a classic example of "Easy to play, tough to master". The game play is very easy to learn, in fact Don't Starve doesn't really tell you how to play, you just point and click. Some items will be clickable, exploration leads to discoveries, and discoveries lead to longer survival, but death and a new game are always right around the corner. See More


The most important factor that will determine the right size bug out bag is your torso size. You can measure your torso by having a friend or casual acquaintance measure the distance from the top of your Iliac Crest (hip bones) up to the bony prominence at the base of your neck (the last cervical vertebrae). Knowing the length of your torso will help you choose a bug out bag that fits comfortably.
Although most people have enough room to designate a corner of the pantry or an area in the basement for their emergency supplies, there are other options. Assemble or buy a 72-hour survival kit for each member of the family and each pet. Store these items where each family member can grab his or her own in an emergency. Conveniently place these kits in a bedroom closet, on a shelf in the mudroom, or in the trunk of the car. Make sure everyone knows where you have stored the kits, and designate someone to grab kits for pets and young children.
When loaded and put on properly, your hips should carry the bulk of your pack’s weight. Because of this, extra padding in the hip belt can make a lot of difference. However, you should also make sure the hip belt isn’t so bulky that it ends up rubbing your hip bones or ribs uncomfortably. In an ideal world, your bug out bag’s hip belt should fit comfortably between the top of your hip bones and the bottom of your lowest ribs. 
Terraria is a sandbox platform-adventure game, so it partly hinges on beating various bosses. If you play it purely for the sake of defeating all the bosses, you might have little else to do afterwards. Restarting the game won't be as enjoyable either because you'll already know what to expect, causing continued play without a new goal feel mundane or boring. See More
Amazing, clever story not narrated to you. This game is based very much off of intelligence and requires a lot of patience (which is a good thing). The art style is incredibly unique and is nice to look at. The game feels like a 1930s animation almost, and it's very atmospheric. The music is fantastic as well - the music used paints pictures and does so gloriously. Don't Starve is a phenomenal game and I highly recommend it to you. See More
You have to keep track of vitamins, minerals, calorie intake, warmth and so much more in SCUM, as well as it boasting some realistic approaches to stamina and body shapes determining the kind of athlete you are. Your skills upgrade the more you play, which is just one of many reasons why it’s captivated so many players so early on in its development.

Don’t forget spices and nutritional supplements. Yes, you can plan a well-balanced diet with prepared foods, but not everyone has the same taste. Spices and herbs allow you to change up the flavor of the same basic ingredients for variety and interest. Vitamins and supplements are an important addition to your emergency supply stash. Choose nutrition bars, protein powder, or multivitamin capsules that support nutrition and boost natural immunity.


We can only survive for three hours in extreme heat or cold – and most places in the world, including most of the USA, experiences either extreme heat or extreme cold (or both in some cases) depending on the time of the year. Would you be able to survive comfortably in the dead of winter without any form of electricity or heating? Do you have a stockpile of resources that will allow you to build fires the old-fashioned way through the whole of winter? What about if you’re away from your home when something catastrophic occurs? Do you have easy access to materials to be able to improvise a shelter or tent?
Sheila,  I am in exactly the same position as you.  I am 62, a retired RN, living in a FEMA trailer in a RV park.  All the residents here are full time. I don’t even have a vehicle. Circumstances can be rough, especially with no real income beyond survival expenses.  Can you have a garden?  What about foraging, dehydrating, canning anything that you don’t immediately use. I am including my email. Contact me if you wish.  It seems we may have similar problems but many of the same solutions!  culversonrn@gmail.com

Tent: In many emergency situations, shelter may be hard to find. While packing a traditional tent may not be a viable option, a good bug out bag should always include a waterproof survival tent. The best survival tents are made of Mylar, which can retain heat and repel water. Pro-tip: Be sure to stack leaves, grass or anything else from around the campsite against the tent for added protection from the elements.

The second aspect of prepping (and some feel this is even more important than the first) is the acquisition of survival knowledge. Feeding your family becomes a lot easier if you know how to hunt or fish, or if you know how to grow or raise your own food. Getting your hands on drinking water is made more challenging if you don’t know how to find safe water in the wild, and if you don’t know how to turn unsafe water into drinkable water. Defending your family against wild animals or dangerous looters is safer if you know how to wield a firearm, have experience with primitive weapons, or know martial arts and self defense. Treating wounds and illnesses is more of a possibility if you can recognize medicinal plants in the wild and know what they can be used for. All of these skills were probably pretty commonplace two hundred years ago, but nowadays most people are woefully under prepared for any kind of true survival situation.


There are 2 types of bug out bags; homemade and pre-made. While there are some folks content to make their own bug out bag there are also plenty who would prefer to simply pick up one that’s already been well thought out and prepared for them. In this review guide we’re going to take a look at the best of those pre-made bug out bags and discuss what makes each of them the best bug out bag worth having should the creek rise or a hurricane make landfall in your area.

Overall, the simulation aspects are handled quite well, and there is a lot to micromanage. Resources such as lumber and coal must be harvested and managed to construct buildings and keep your city warm. Rationing and finding food is important too, as your citizens need to eat to work. You will also be managing your "hope" and "discontent" metrics which is a general indicator of your population's happiness. Overwork them and they may revolt or die of exhaustion. Underwork them and they may starve or freeze to death. Finding this delicate balance between survival and keeping people content is where the game truly shines. See More
There is a LOT of information on the web about what to pack in a bug out bag. You first need to figure out what you’re planning on before you can figure out what to put in your bug out bag. My post on 10 tips how to pack a bug out bag could be one place to start. Also check out this page for some ideas of what to pack that you might not have thought of.
For cooking I've got multiple options: I have the Rocket stove which uses any biomass, ie wood, sticks, dried blackberry brambles, pine cones, you name it, it will prolly burn it. I might have to try dried cow patties, I'll bet they'd work too. I have a 3 burner propane stove and a number of portable tanks that would last a few weeksmaybe a month. My latest purchase was a package of kerosene burning appliances, including three different stoves, a high pressure lantern, hurricane lamps, wind-up radio and lights too. Check it out at St Paul Merchantile. Mine should arrive tomorrow. I'm looking forward to trying it out. So, I will set aside about 30 gallons of kerosene for now, but may end up putting in a large below ground tank for longterm storage. 
The result is a survival game where surviving is more important than amassing an arsenal of military-grade gear. Although once you’ve figured out how to take care of your body you still have endgame goals such as exploring high security areas, improving your supply of guns, and dabbling with PvP. If you need help with any of that check out our top Scum tips, and if that’s not quite enough help there are some very useful Scum admin commands for you, too.
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