I’m a single mother of a (almost 5 year old), I live with my parents on a 9.5 acre ranch about 45 minutes to an hour North-West of the heart of Houston Texas and one of my greatest concerns are hurricanes. My parents grew up close to the border of Louisiana, they have survived several hurricanes by either purchasing a 3-5 day supply of survival goods & riding out the storm OR by evacuating. Since we live out here my families first choice is ALWAYS hunkering down & riding out the storm (while its scary during the storm, I prefer this choice because we are home, we can begin repairs immediately as well as defend our home from criminals targeting victims who felt evacuating was necessary) My dad wants to purchase a Generator and thinks that this is prepping. Short-term this is fine however, I remember when Katrina hit New Orleans and then Ike hit Galveston/Houston, our roads were clogged with people evacuating, Gas stations were out of Gas and still crowded, people were scared & nervous, tensions were high… needless to say on both occasions it was scary. I want to prep Not only for hurricanes but just about anything that can and most likely will turn the unprepared hords of people into Mobs that are scared and desperate. Ive tried talking to my parents about the importance of preparing for a natural event and/or any other cataclysmic event that would cause this to happen, and what we should do to prevent our family from becoming victims not only from what could happen but from the people but my parents think that buying a generator and filling a plastic Rubbermaid storage bin with what the National Hurricane Center suggests to prepare for hurricane season is good enough. They have mentioned how it’s not likely that anything is going to happen (personally I feel that it’s arrogant to say that nothing will happen… Something is EVENTUALLY going to happen) and we shouldn’t be worried because we do have weapons to defend ourselves (but no ammo… cuz that’s so useful) and we have some land so we can just grow vegetables get a cow and become self reliant (with is good but without practice and preps we won’t last a week… plus, where are you going to get a cow when everyone is freaking out?) They have also mentioned before that my “ambitious” thoughts for prepping is expensive and time consuming… my thought on cutting cost is that we have tons of stuff around our ranch that we don’t use, that we could sell and use the money for our preps, and the space that is being occupied with this “stuff” is where I want to keep my preps. MY question is, how do I convince my parents that we need to prepare for self reliance in the event of a hurricane (or series of hurricanes in one season) or any other event? And if I can’t convince my parents to start prepping with me, what can I do to start prepping that will also help my parents start prepping? My mom grew up learning how to make preserves & other homemade canned goods, should I ask her to teach me? I have been reading articles and learning on how to prep, what we need, our food/water preps as well as replenishment, what to do, where to go (if we have to bug-out) ect. but it seems like I can’t get my plan up & off the ground without my parents (or at least their support). I believe that being self reliant is important however being on a 9.5 acre ranch with my mother, father, daughter and sister, my family is my community, they are the people that I will need in tough times and the only ones I will be able to trust, they are also the reason why I want to start prepping. So any advice, information or help that anyone has to offer would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much!
Each of your randomly-generated survivors have backstories, providing them with abilities for survival. Ex-firemen are fitter and stronger, while those who used to cook professionally can now feed the starving. But heading out into the world to find the things you need – medicine, ingredients, scrap to make beds – could bring you face-to-face with those willing to kill. And turning a survivor into a murderer leads to misery, depression, and – if not treated well – suicide.
You'll have to repeatedly collect a lot of basic materials like twigs, grass, and ore. This is because most of the starting recipes share the same required materials. Even later in the game you'll be doing many repetitive tasks. Gathering enough firewood for winter is especially bad because you have to chop down dozens of trees. All of this is made worse by the limited inventory space, causing you to make the same trip multiple times. See More
Although most people have enough room to designate a corner of the pantry or an area in the basement for their emergency supplies, there are other options. Assemble or buy a 72-hour survival kit for each member of the family and each pet. Store these items where each family member can grab his or her own in an emergency. Conveniently place these kits in a bedroom closet, on a shelf in the mudroom, or in the trunk of the car. Make sure everyone knows where you have stored the kits, and designate someone to grab kits for pets and young children.

With the world seeming to become a more volatile and dangerous place with every encroaching year, it can be hard to know exactly where you can feel safe. The modern media is overloaded with stories about violence, crime, and sensational pieces on the worst people in our society. But there have to be some places within the United States where the chances of anything like that happening to you is next to impossible, right?
People ask if I was in the military. Yeah, but it was 80 lbs and 40 years ago. Special Forces “A TEAM” medic in fact. But I forgot a lot of that. I carried 120 lb rut when we moved out, but about 40 lbs of ammo and grenades on patrol. I have 2 dozen ruts now, from patrol size to major moveout size. I put 80 lbs of cat litter (we have a cat rescue) to practice the other day … and I had a very hard time to get up with it. So I dropped that to 40 and hit the treadmill 3 miles and 3 mph. I will need to do that for awhile before increasing the weight. I’m 220 wanting 180 but at 66 yrs it’s becoming harder to do things. Hips, knees, shoulders, knuckles .. they are all stiff and ache. So I may have to cut back. But to tell someone just bring 12 rounds of ammo …… that’s crazy. Get an AR in 22 cal, the Ruger Takedown fits well in our ruts. 300 rnds of 22lr is light. I have a Glock M22 40 can with a 22 conversion that works great, same for 1911 45 / 22. In reality, it all comes down as to what the threat is perceived to be. CPAP: my new one is 10 oz, and 6 days of rechargeable batteries are 4 lbs. Solar panel or 110 to recharge the batteries. Forget the CPAP = loud snoring and dog tired wakeup.
Pack things that make you self-sufficient – if you are thinking about an item that you will need to pair with something that you are going to need to source on the way, forget it.  If you are moving to safety, the last thing you want to do is worry about scavenging.  Pack complementary and multi-purpose items that can be used both individually and together to save space.
One thing that the article doesn’t reference is “How many people will there be in your Bug Out party?” The point being, that although there are some items that need to be in everyones B.O.B, there are others that don’t require duplication. Figuring out which items can be used by all the members of your party can reduce duplicating these items in each bag. For example, does everyone in your party need to carry a 1 quart backpacking pot, or will 1 or 2 suffice for your whole group? Those types of items can then be parceled out to the members of the group, and cut the weight down.
William, me and my husband are in our late 50’s, and we live in a rural area too, with lots of trees, with few people around. I, myself have read many survival books, (audio too), and websites, and have signed up for so many survival website newsletters, it’s ridiculous! Anyway, I’ve learned very much from them, over the many years, and if I haven’t learned anything, I’ve at least learned that you need other people, a small community to survive. I would love to talk more to you and your wife about your plans, and other things pertaining to survival, and about our religion. Would you mind chatting with me, about them? I’m joanofark06 (zero six) on a website (short registration), called wireclub dot com. Just put my name in the search for people. I’d love to hear more about your views on this subject.
I believe the “poor” as in homeless have a better understanding of survival than the average person. We’ll be looking to them for help. I understand that you want to help others less fortunate. But myself, I have to think about my two children, my husband and myself. I’m sorry, but they are and always will be my TOP priority. If it’s them of someone else…well you already know my answer.
Everything Ark does is rock-solid. The survival elements may be similar to what you’ve played before, but they’re the bedrock for the game’s more ambitious elements (and a strong Ark mods scene). Your character has RPG-like stats, and you can head into the world to hunt sci-fi secrets that offer a little more incentive to play rather than just ‘stay alive’.
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