Denier is the term that is most often used to suggest the strength of the threads in the fabric used to create the pack. And when it comes to the quality of the seams, look for a pack that advertises double-stitched seams if you want a pack that will last longer and holds up against the environmental factors it could be exposed to in the event of an emergency. Ultimately, your pack is an investment in your survival and the contents of the BOB don’t do any good if your pack fails and you can’t carry everything.
If SHTF or you have a house fire or whatever, your family members may need to reach someone. Does everyone in your family have the phone numbers, full names, addresses and directions to the home and office of all your other family members and people you trust? Do you have all the police, fire and hospital numbers and addresses listed? Make a very thorough list and make sure everyone has a copy of it. This list should go into your overall emergency plan.

Completely blown away by amazing graphics, great sound effects and an eargasm level of music. The environment is harsh, your decisions even harsher. Everything you do affects the outcome of the game, and beating the main story took me quite a few attempts. Endless mode invites for trying out different strategies, and the achievements give nice ideas for different approach on the main story. See More
One thing that the article doesn’t reference is “How many people will there be in your Bug Out party?” The point being, that although there are some items that need to be in everyones B.O.B, there are others that don’t require duplication. Figuring out which items can be used by all the members of your party can reduce duplicating these items in each bag. For example, does everyone in your party need to carry a 1 quart backpacking pot, or will 1 or 2 suffice for your whole group? Those types of items can then be parceled out to the members of the group, and cut the weight down.
Not every damn thing needs multiplayer, and multiplayer can often ruin an otherwise incredible experience. There's none to be found here, and that intensifies the lonely atmosphere. Also, the creators didn't waste resources on something that would fundamentally undermine the experience so they could focus on making the game the wonderful thing that it is. See More
The second aspect of prepping (and some feel this is even more important than the first) is the acquisition of survival knowledge. Feeding your family becomes a lot easier if you know how to hunt or fish, or if you know how to grow or raise your own food. Getting your hands on drinking water is made more challenging if you don’t know how to find safe water in the wild, and if you don’t know how to turn unsafe water into drinkable water. Defending your family against wild animals or dangerous looters is safer if you know how to wield a firearm, have experience with primitive weapons, or know martial arts and self defense. Treating wounds and illnesses is more of a possibility if you can recognize medicinal plants in the wild and know what they can be used for. All of these skills were probably pretty commonplace two hundred years ago, but nowadays most people are woefully under prepared for any kind of true survival situation.

If your bag is so heavy that you can’t carry it more than a few miles, you’ll have to ditch some of the items, anyway. And what’s going to happen if you have to run from attackers, jump walls, and climb fences? Having a bag that’s too heavy could get you killed. Ideally, a bug out bag should weigh about 15% of your body weight, assuming you’re in decent shape. 20% of your body weight should be the absolute maximum.
Water is truly the staff of life, without it, you will die in just a few days.  Assume that for whatever reason, your taps won’t work – there is no water coming into your home.  What else do you have?  Do you have bottled water somewhere?  Did you know there is about 50 gallons of water stored in your water heater?  There’s also a few gallons in the tank of your toilet!  If you have an outside water source – such as a lake, creek or storm drain – do you have a way to filter it?  Your first goal with water should be to be able to provide your family with 2 weeks worth of water and a way to continue filtering found water after that.  Here is a great place to start learning about water.
I bought water in gallon jugs, the $.79 Walmart ones. ALL of them leaked after a few months and damaged the area I stored them. Another tip, some foods go bad faster than you think and you may not even know it. Example; We eat lots of taco shells, so I bought several boxes. By the time we got to the the last ones, they looked completely normal but tasted GROOOSSS!! Now I Know to only keep a few boxes at a time. Excellent article!
Keep in mind, a well-designed bug out bag should weigh no more than 25% of your body weight, assuming you are in average physical condition and are not overweight. Any heavier than that can make carrying the bag highly strenuous and limit your ability to remain mobile and travel long distances on foot during an evacuation. Limit your packing list to the essentials that will help you survive.
Just today I contacted an old acquantaince whom I had been deployed (Army) with previously. I have a great homestead in the country, he has good security skills (I can’t defend my place by myself). We are going to plan on this being his (and his family’s) bug-out location, and I will be surviving in place, with help. So if your family has military, police, etc, type of connections, try those first.
As the player makes progress in the game by interacting with the environment, killing zombies or building things, they are rewarded with skill points that can be used to unlock new skills such as combat strength, higher stamina or new crafting options. But even though the skill system can seemingly make the game easier, the severity and size of the zombie hordes will keep increasing with the time spent in game and the progress made by the player, keeping them on the edge and making them feel a constant pressure that an attack may come at any time and that they should be prepared. See More
There is A LOT more!  But this will get you off the ground on your adventure in getting prepared!  We suggest you read about The Path of the Prepper and follow it.  Join the APN and become an active member of the community. You can safely ask questions there and very quickly get 30 different opinions on what you’re trying to figure out!  You’ll be able to make new friends who are just as interested in your new lifestyle.  Find out about your state networks and get active in them.  If you’re so inclined, start making a bit of money by writing about your experience!  Everyone loves to read articles written by people who are just getting started.

I noticed that a reliable light weight firearm was on the list. While many may think it uselss, a good high powered barrel break pellet rifle can do almost as much as a 22 rifle. A hundred dollars will get you one at Walmart that you can switch from .177 caliber to 22 caliber. The rifle breaks down and is easily carried inside of a decent back pack. The weight of the ammo is significantly lighter as well. This can be used to take down most birds, squirls, rabbits, small pigs and even foxes as well as racoons, armadillo’s. And snakes. All sources of protein.
Preppers are “Ready for Anything”.  We don’t prepare for just one thing as some TV shows would have you believe. The Prepper philosophy dictates that you prepare for anything that might come your way.  As such, one of your first steps is an assessment of your situation.  What kind of things happen in your region?  If you live in Louisiana, you have a high chance of having (another) hurricane hit you.  If you’re in Maine, you have a very high chance of winter ice storms that knock power out.  If you live in California, you have a high chance of an earthquake.  This site can show you a lot about regional hazards while this site will show you charts of where it’s “safer” to live.
People ask if I was in the military. Yeah, but it was 80 lbs and 40 years ago. Special Forces “A TEAM” medic in fact. But I forgot a lot of that. I carried 120 lb rut when we moved out, but about 40 lbs of ammo and grenades on patrol. I have 2 dozen ruts now, from patrol size to major moveout size. I put 80 lbs of cat litter (we have a cat rescue) to practice the other day … and I had a very hard time to get up with it. So I dropped that to 40 and hit the treadmill 3 miles and 3 mph. I will need to do that for awhile before increasing the weight. I’m 220 wanting 180 but at 66 yrs it’s becoming harder to do things. Hips, knees, shoulders, knuckles .. they are all stiff and ache. So I may have to cut back. But to tell someone just bring 12 rounds of ammo …… that’s crazy. Get an AR in 22 cal, the Ruger Takedown fits well in our ruts. 300 rnds of 22lr is light. I have a Glock M22 40 can with a 22 conversion that works great, same for 1911 45 / 22. In reality, it all comes down as to what the threat is perceived to be. CPAP: my new one is 10 oz, and 6 days of rechargeable batteries are 4 lbs. Solar panel or 110 to recharge the batteries. Forget the CPAP = loud snoring and dog tired wakeup.
We have all the free survival games at GameTop. GameTop has been in the business of distributing free full version games for over 10 years and has always been the best site for gamers to download free games. All our games are all legally licensed and are free from annoying in-game advertisements or spyware. Over the years, we have collected a huge library of survival games. You can be assured that we have the best survival games that you are looking for.
The whole process of creating new tools is mostly done using a sophisticated 3D-printer available from the start of the game. You gather various resources and transform them to create tools that you will need for your survival. For example, organic matter gets printed into raw carbon, combine carbon with some zinc and you get a battery; combine that battery with some glass and you get a flashlight that helps you see in the dark. It's very straightforward but incredibly satisfying when you build your tools, especially since you are doing all of this while swimming in an ocean filled with predators. See More
I’m a single mother of a (almost 5 year old), I live with my parents on a 9.5 acre ranch about 45 minutes to an hour North-West of the heart of Houston Texas and one of my greatest concerns are hurricanes. My parents grew up close to the border of Louisiana, they have survived several hurricanes by either purchasing a 3-5 day supply of survival goods & riding out the storm OR by evacuating. Since we live out here my families first choice is ALWAYS hunkering down & riding out the storm (while its scary during the storm, I prefer this choice because we are home, we can begin repairs immediately as well as defend our home from criminals targeting victims who felt evacuating was necessary) My dad wants to purchase a Generator and thinks that this is prepping. Short-term this is fine however, I remember when Katrina hit New Orleans and then Ike hit Galveston/Houston, our roads were clogged with people evacuating, Gas stations were out of Gas and still crowded, people were scared & nervous, tensions were high… needless to say on both occasions it was scary. I want to prep Not only for hurricanes but just about anything that can and most likely will turn the unprepared hords of people into Mobs that are scared and desperate. Ive tried talking to my parents about the importance of preparing for a natural event and/or any other cataclysmic event that would cause this to happen, and what we should do to prevent our family from becoming victims not only from what could happen but from the people but my parents think that buying a generator and filling a plastic Rubbermaid storage bin with what the National Hurricane Center suggests to prepare for hurricane season is good enough. They have mentioned how it’s not likely that anything is going to happen (personally I feel that it’s arrogant to say that nothing will happen… Something is EVENTUALLY going to happen) and we shouldn’t be worried because we do have weapons to defend ourselves (but no ammo… cuz that’s so useful) and we have some land so we can just grow vegetables get a cow and become self reliant (with is good but without practice and preps we won’t last a week… plus, where are you going to get a cow when everyone is freaking out?) They have also mentioned before that my “ambitious” thoughts for prepping is expensive and time consuming… my thought on cutting cost is that we have tons of stuff around our ranch that we don’t use, that we could sell and use the money for our preps, and the space that is being occupied with this “stuff” is where I want to keep my preps. MY question is, how do I convince my parents that we need to prepare for self reliance in the event of a hurricane (or series of hurricanes in one season) or any other event? And if I can’t convince my parents to start prepping with me, what can I do to start prepping that will also help my parents start prepping? My mom grew up learning how to make preserves & other homemade canned goods, should I ask her to teach me? I have been reading articles and learning on how to prep, what we need, our food/water preps as well as replenishment, what to do, where to go (if we have to bug-out) ect. but it seems like I can’t get my plan up & off the ground without my parents (or at least their support). I believe that being self reliant is important however being on a 9.5 acre ranch with my mother, father, daughter and sister, my family is my community, they are the people that I will need in tough times and the only ones I will be able to trust, they are also the reason why I want to start prepping. So any advice, information or help that anyone has to offer would be greatly appreciated. Thank you so much!
Packing a bug out bag can seem overwhelming as the task of not forgetting something important can be daunting. There are many checklists out there that will tell you the essential items you should always keep in your bug out bag. You can buy an already packed Bug out Bag, like this one here- Urban Survival Bug Out Bag, which contains essentials items like food, water, and a first aid kit. You can also check out our Bug Out Bag Checklist and personalize your bag yourself.
Preppers are “Ready for Anything”.  We don’t prepare for just one thing as some TV shows would have you believe. The Prepper philosophy dictates that you prepare for anything that might come your way.  As such, one of your first steps is an assessment of your situation.  What kind of things happen in your region?  If you live in Louisiana, you have a high chance of having (another) hurricane hit you.  If you’re in Maine, you have a very high chance of winter ice storms that knock power out.  If you live in California, you have a high chance of an earthquake.  This site can show you a lot about regional hazards while this site will show you charts of where it’s “safer” to live.
When calamity strikes you’ll still need to eat and if there are no shelters in the vicinity stocked with emergency supplies what are you supposed to do? The answer is the Food Insurance bug out bag that provides you with copious amounts of prepared food sealed in vacuum pouches and ready to be eaten. Every Food Insurance meal has a shelf life of more than a decade and requires only a bit of water to prepare. Everything from lasagna to omelets to rice and beans are here along with the stove to cook them. Add some of your own survival gear like a tactical flashlight, survival knife, emergency blankets and water filter and you’re ready for whatever comes down the pike.
A bug out bag is critical but what do you put in it? When considering disaster preparedness, keep in mind that what survival gear and emergency supplies you add to your bug out bag and then pack for your survival kit can mean the difference between life and death, or at least affect your level of comfort if SHTF and you had to get outta dodge. Read this article to find out what you should consider putting in your bug out bag.

If you’re after the best crafting survival game out there, look no further than Minecraft. At some point, it seems someone decided survival was all about gruelling punishment, sloth-like progression, and murdering anyone who isn’t you. But before the big survival blow-out on Steam we had Minecraft: a fun, colourful, creative survival sandbox. Sure, there are zombies that will eat your face, and spiders, skeletons and dragons, but with Minecraft skins, you at least always end up blocky and cute. No one minds a cartoon monster having you for breakfast.
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