Once you’ve got basic stockpiles and plans for meeting all of your basic survival needs, you can move on to skill acquisition. This is where you go from the basics to becoming a certain “type” of prepper. We’ve already gone over some of the skills relevant to shelters, food, and water, but there are a huge variety of useful skills and knowledge that you can pick up that might come in handy in a true disaster scenario. Make sure you check out our survival skills section – pick and choose the things that interest you the most.
As important as the size of the pack you choose is the comfort of the pack. Many of the packs that we reviewed have compression straps, extra padding, and other features to ensure that your body is healthy and able to carry what you need. In general, comfort is largely a balance between enough padding and a lighter weight so that the bag doesn’t hinder your ability to move efficiently. When you’re considering the comfort of a given bug out bag, you’ll also want to pay extra attention to how the pack’s hip belt is constructed.
If everyone is prepping, doesn’t this make us less humans and less Christians. We are preparing for maybe two weeks, but if something like what they are describing happens, It will set up the earth back to the dark ages. Most of the people on earth will die and the biggest threat is not surviving with food, water and ammo but medicines which right now they are prescriptions.
To me, the best option is to store emergency food. How much? If you have none, store enough for a few days. If you have enough for a few days, get enough for a week. How much you store depends on what time frame you think you're at risk for having to be completely independent. The early settlers of the southwest liked to store enough food for a whole year and still do to this day!

Cold weather gloves: A sturdy pair of gloves will provide you with better grip, protect your hands from cuts and splinters, offer warmth in low temperatures, and keeps your hands clean to reduce the risk of infection. In the aftermath of a disaster, you may be tasked with moving fallen branches, gathering firewood, or making your way through broken glass, and high-quality gloves will give you the dexterity to accomplish these tasks.
Thanks for being concerned about others, we need more people in the nation like you. My response would be that, as Christians, our first and foremost concern is to live a life in right standing with Almighty God, and to live by faith, not be fear, EVERY DAY. Secondly, is live life daily by the virtue of God given wisdom. Scripture says that Wisdom is the principle thing, get Wisdom, and with all they getting, get Understanding. Compassion is a virtue of the Spirit, also now popular known as Agape Love. To Love God and thy Neighbor is to fulfill all the Law and the Prophets. This article makes perfect sense when the author says that a good place to START, is with your home and family. Your home is a natural place to start, and those in your immediate vicinity, your family are the most logical individuals to be concerned about first. When you have first things first squared away, then you can start thinking about your immediate neighbors, and possible form a neighborhood preparedness plan with them. Then you all can branch out to your greater neighborhood, and finally your community, and then set up networks with other near by communities in your state, just in case your community needs to evacuate faster than what FEMA can organize. I think by taking care of yourself first (not selfishly but with a definite end in view) you are better prepared to help others in a time of crisis.

Jim BAs far as cheese goes. It is ok to pack away poredwed stuff. Light wieght and cheap. But not too healthy.If you really want to pack away cheese, do it the old fashion way. Buy wheels of hard cheese (the harder the longer it last) cover them with cheesewax, (you can easily do this at home) several coats. Hang the cheese in a net in a cool dry place. 20 years shelf life.
The most important factor that will determine the right size bug out bag is your torso size. You can measure your torso by having a friend or casual acquaintance measure the distance from the top of your Iliac Crest (hip bones) up to the bony prominence at the base of your neck (the last cervical vertebrae). Knowing the length of your torso will help you choose a bug out bag that fits comfortably.
It’s an attitude of awareness about the fragility of  stability (and of human life), and an understanding of the importance of being properly prepared, just in case society takes a turn for the worst. It’s about being willing to learn new skills that may not seem useful and important to your life right now, because they may prove to be life-saving in a different kind of life (and also because learning survival skills is fun).
A bug out bag is critical but what do you put in it? When considering disaster preparedness, keep in mind that what survival gear and emergency supplies you add to your bug out bag and then pack for your survival kit can mean the difference between life and death, or at least affect your level of comfort if SHTF and you had to get outta dodge. Read this article to find out what you should consider putting in your bug out bag.
The result is a survival game where surviving is more important than amassing an arsenal of military-grade gear. Although once you’ve figured out how to take care of your body you still have endgame goals such as exploring high security areas, improving your supply of guns, and dabbling with PvP. If you need help with any of that check out our top Scum tips, and if that’s not quite enough help there are some very useful Scum admin commands for you, too.
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