If you’re after the best crafting survival game out there, look no further than Minecraft. At some point, it seems someone decided survival was all about gruelling punishment, sloth-like progression, and murdering anyone who isn’t you. But before the big survival blow-out on Steam we had Minecraft: a fun, colourful, creative survival sandbox. Sure, there are zombies that will eat your face, and spiders, skeletons and dragons, but with Minecraft skins, you at least always end up blocky and cute. No one minds a cartoon monster having you for breakfast.
Some will think the omission of foodstuffs from this bug out bag to be a bit odd but it’s not if you think about it. It might be years before you have to use the bag so it makes sense that you’ll want to procure your own emergency rations and review their condition a couple of times a year, replacing anything that might look dodgy. That said this bug out bag does emergency kit right with the aforementioned items as well as a dozen pouches of purified water, rain ponchos, quality toothbrush and toothpaste, shaving razor, comb, emergency whistle, emergency blankets, survival handbook, duct tape (!), paracord and more. There’s also the obligatory deck of cards for when you finally settle into the emergency shelter. Toss in some dry clothes for everyone involved, charger cords for your smartphone in case you run into a power source and a good book or two and you’ll be ready to wait out events in good shape.
You might think this is out of place for a How to be a prepper list but it’s pretty important. Stocking items and taking lessons will take money. If you’re swamped with bills, you won’t be able to pay for things so you’ll have to do everything the hard way and you won’t be as far along as you could be. Take a look at your finances and start living within your means. There’s even a great Rich Dad Cashflow 101 board game that goes along with his book series. I’ve been reading the Rich Dad Poor Dad series for years. Awesome ideas in there.

2)  Check out the LDS (Mormon) site. They sell a limited number of items to non-church members at ridiculously low prices. I’ve purchased rice, beans, wheat, flour and oats from them. I hear they will even let non-members into the “graineries” if you pre-arrange with the local stake. A grainery I hear has a much larger assortment of foods and you do the actual canning of the foodstuffs. The price is reportedly cheaper too. As of this time I haven’t done this but read a blog where a person did and was very impressed with the selection and prices.

I may have been a bit dramatic in my response in cases, but mainly to show you the absurdity of the way you dramatically declare most of that useful kit should be discarded, as if you know best, as if you’ve been there done it, survived, worn the t-shirt, as if you think you’re come special forces commando that has survived behind enemy lines in every environment/climate the globe has to offer, totally ignoring the idiosyncrasies of each location around the world, for example you say knife .22 and “dump the rest”, because people living in an area with limited game but masses of water and fish to ditch their fishing line, hooks, weights etc for a .22… OK yea, I know who not to join up with in a disaster, the man carrying a f*cking sword to a gun fight
For someone new to being a Survivalist building your first Bug Out Bag can seem like a big task. Everybody you read about has been tweaking theirs for months or even years and has a pile of gear built up. It’s hard to know where to start, but if you cover all of the basics in a survival situation you will still be much better off that 99% of the people.
There are several different biomes in Conan Exiles. Barren wastelands, harsh deserts, sparkling rivers, and haunted forests are just a few of the ones you'll encounter, but you'll want to get out there and really explore the environment. Every biome holds different secrets to discover and, more importantly, different materials so you can craft new stuff, which is always satisfying. Exploring also lets you scout out enemies that you plan to attack, find new areas you want to settle, or even make new friends to cohabit the area with. You'll have to explore whether you want to or not, but Conan Exiles makes it very enjoyable by making sure it's a rewarding experience. See More
There is A LOT more!  But this will get you off the ground on your adventure in getting prepared!  We suggest you read about The Path of the Prepper and follow it.  Join the APN and become an active member of the community. You can safely ask questions there and very quickly get 30 different opinions on what you’re trying to figure out!  You’ll be able to make new friends who are just as interested in your new lifestyle.  Find out about your state networks and get active in them.  If you’re so inclined, start making a bit of money by writing about your experience!  Everyone loves to read articles written by people who are just getting started.
Starting out you'll only be gathering twigs and grass, maybe chop a tree. You'll also gather basic food such as mushrooms and carrots. Then you'll start building your encampment, learning how the day/night cycle and the seasons work. Later on you'll start building massive farms, refridgerators, fortifications, and many other things. All of this is done for the sake of not starving. As the game progresses, you will encounter mechanics such as drought, forest fires, the rainy, season, the cold and many others. To counteract these you need to plan properly and will probably die the first time around. Once your knowledge reaches a certain level, you'll be able to survive indefinitely. See More
We can only survive for three hours in extreme heat or cold – and most places in the world, including most of the USA, experiences either extreme heat or extreme cold (or both in some cases) depending on the time of the year. Would you be able to survive comfortably in the dead of winter without any form of electricity or heating? Do you have a stockpile of resources that will allow you to build fires the old-fashioned way through the whole of winter? What about if you’re away from your home when something catastrophic occurs? Do you have easy access to materials to be able to improvise a shelter or tent?
For me, a walk out would be a huge barrier to overcome, and the potential for catastrophy is in all likelihood a given outcome. Vehicular Bug Out is the only option in that case, and it may not be the option we’re presented with. Bugging In, if possible, is the best option then, even if a power outage is a permanent feature. The pros still outweigh the cons.
Keep in mind, a well-designed bug out bag should weigh no more than 25% of your body weight, assuming you are in average physical condition and are not overweight. Any heavier than that can make carrying the bag highly strenuous and limit your ability to remain mobile and travel long distances on foot during an evacuation. Limit your packing list to the essentials that will help you survive.
I think you’re both correct, although you are addressing separate threat levels and emergencies (civil disobedience vs. natural disaster). I keep a basic bag, plus a small box with optionals that can be quickly loaded, depending on the threat. I realize this may take precious seconds, so this is time dependent. I live in the Chicago area, so civil unrest is a greater concern, and my firearms choice reflects this probable eventuality.
Stick with it (and also grab a few friends) and DayZ begins to slowly flourish, however. DayZ as a whole is something of a slow game with human encounters being few and far between, as well as there being a likelihood that they may just kill you outright. It was in Early Access for an obscene and controversial length of time, though its 1.0 update wasn’t without its problems, either.
For now I am planning on bugging-in in the suburbs while maintaining the ability to quickly bug-out if necessary. I am considering buying an isolated piece of property that would still be reached within a two day hike if necessary. Once I find that property I'll plan accordingly and stock some thing there with the plan of bugging-out sooner rather than later.
I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
Prepping is kinda associated with people who prep for stupidly over the top unlikely SHTF scenarios were if the world as we know it has gone then yes maybe a lot of electronics will be useless, but not all, the longer you keep your mobile alive the longer you could have access to what is basically an e-reader which could house millions of survival books and associated materials like mechanics, first aid etc etc, I’d rather carry my tiny phone and a few batteries and a small solar charger than the weight of a stack of books, because in reality you’d need much more knowledge to survive than the significant majority of people possess in their heads, knowledge is power.

Prepping is getting more mainstream today and there is a lot of information out there now about getting ready for an emergency or in case SHTF, but if you’re new to being a prepper, what should you do first? You need to know how to start prepping. If you’re one of my regular readers, you may be a bit more advanced when it comes to prepping because my typical articles have been for more thorough research. It’s time I start balancing things and have  some articles that have a bit more reach and are more useful to the 99% of people out there looking to prepare their families for emergencies or in case SHTF or even prepping for doomsday.


So despite the impression many people got from my “50 Items” article, I don’t think you should pack your bug out bag with as many items as possible. In fact, I think you should check your bag for any non-essential items with a large weight-to-space ratio and remove them. To that end, here’s a list of survival items I’ve seen in various lists online that, in my opinion, you don’t really need in your bug out bag.
The game’s survival elements include the food and water requirements that most games in the genre do, but there’s obviously a more pressing issue in Subnautica: oxygen. You can’t breathe sea water, so your oxygen levels and consumption have to be on your mind at all times. Seeing as you’re continually threatened with the prospect of drowning, you really should read our Subnautica guide to ensure you squeeze every last drop out of your diver’s life. Every survival game has the ominous shadow following you around, but here it’s simply good old O2.
When loaded and put on properly, your hips should carry the bulk of your pack’s weight. Because of this, extra padding in the hip belt can make a lot of difference. However, you should also make sure the hip belt isn’t so bulky that it ends up rubbing your hip bones or ribs uncomfortably. In an ideal world, your bug out bag’s hip belt should fit comfortably between the top of your hip bones and the bottom of your lowest ribs. 
For those who desire a story to go with their survival gaming, The Long Dark offers a fully voiced-acted, five chapter story mode called "Wintermute" complete with cutscenes. It features all the survival gameplay aspects of the sandbox version, as well as story quests and character development, making it an engaging, new way to experience all the game has to offer. In the story, you'll assume the role of a man trying to survive in the harsh Canadian wilderness after crashing his plane during a geomagnetic disaster. Rather than just a no-bones survival situation, you'll be working through an actual storyline as you head for safety. As you progress the story, you'll have the opportunity to do quests, watch voice-acted cutscenes, and interact with other characters who are fighting for their lives as well. This pulls you even deeper into the game world since you now have a real goal to work for - escaping the harsh wilderness alive. Story mode adds a deeper layer of immersion via storytelling than the sandbox mode, which is only about surviving as long as you can. Though currently not all of the chapters are available as they are released episodically over time. See More

It is easy to improvise most things on this list but some can’t be improvised so easy on the go, thing is if you are bugging out to a safe area you can possibly keep things minimalist, and if you are lucky enough to legally obtain firearms then a reliable compact pistol such as a Walther P22 or Springfield XD 40 can be teamed up with either take down .22lr rifle (AR7-1022tdr) or .40S&W carbine so you can have close in capabilities and also reach beyond the typical shotgun toting highway raider.


As the player makes progress in the game by interacting with the environment, killing zombies or building things, they are rewarded with skill points that can be used to unlock new skills such as combat strength, higher stamina or new crafting options. But even though the skill system can seemingly make the game easier, the severity and size of the zombie hordes will keep increasing with the time spent in game and the progress made by the player, keeping them on the edge and making them feel a constant pressure that an attack may come at any time and that they should be prepared. See More

There is a LOT of information on the web about what to pack in a bug out bag. You first need to figure out what you’re planning on before you can figure out what to put in your bug out bag. My post on 10 tips how to pack a bug out bag could be one place to start. Also check out this page for some ideas of what to pack that you might not have thought of.


When loaded and put on properly, your hips should carry the bulk of your pack’s weight. Because of this, extra padding in the hip belt can make a lot of difference. However, you should also make sure the hip belt isn’t so bulky that it ends up rubbing your hip bones or ribs uncomfortably. In an ideal world, your bug out bag’s hip belt should fit comfortably between the top of your hip bones and the bottom of your lowest ribs. 

If you choose not to can or dehydrate your own foods, Emergency Essentials has all your bases covered, with a huge selection of freeze-dried and dehydrated foods to see you through in a crisis. We’ve got everything from whole grains to fruits and vegetables to premium meats, so you know you’re getting high-quality food that’s packaged and processed with your family’s needs in mind.
If everyone is prepping, doesn’t this make us less humans and less Christians. We are preparing for maybe two weeks, but if something like what they are describing happens, It will set up the earth back to the dark ages. Most of the people on earth will die and the biggest threat is not surviving with food, water and ammo but medicines which right now they are prescriptions.
You will be able to prep only at the basic level (to withstand about a week or so of unrest, Im speaking of civil unrest. Any type of chemical or nuclear attack and it is very unlikely you will not survive in an apt structure) You need two weeks of food and water–long term food storage items, not items from the local grocery store. You also should purchase a gun for each of you and take some shooting classes at the shooting range. Lastly, You need to stock up on any perscription medications you take on a regular basis, you can accomplish this by ‘losing’ a perscription every now and then and having the pharmacist replace it. You should have no less than 6 months of perscriptions even if you only have limited food and water–it can also be used to bargain with later. Best of luck to you.
One thing that the article doesn’t reference is “How many people will there be in your Bug Out party?” The point being, that although there are some items that need to be in everyones B.O.B, there are others that don’t require duplication. Figuring out which items can be used by all the members of your party can reduce duplicating these items in each bag. For example, does everyone in your party need to carry a 1 quart backpacking pot, or will 1 or 2 suffice for your whole group? Those types of items can then be parceled out to the members of the group, and cut the weight down.

For those who desire a story to go with their survival gaming, The Long Dark offers a fully voiced-acted, five chapter story mode called "Wintermute" complete with cutscenes. It features all the survival gameplay aspects of the sandbox version, as well as story quests and character development, making it an engaging, new way to experience all the game has to offer. In the story, you'll assume the role of a man trying to survive in the harsh Canadian wilderness after crashing his plane during a geomagnetic disaster. Rather than just a no-bones survival situation, you'll be working through an actual storyline as you head for safety. As you progress the story, you'll have the opportunity to do quests, watch voice-acted cutscenes, and interact with other characters who are fighting for their lives as well. This pulls you even deeper into the game world since you now have a real goal to work for - escaping the harsh wilderness alive. Story mode adds a deeper layer of immersion via storytelling than the sandbox mode, which is only about surviving as long as you can. Though currently not all of the chapters are available as they are released episodically over time. See More


Some advice please; I am a single male 45 years old living on a fixed income because of brain cancer surgery and subsequent treatment left me with seizures. My 3 children are grown now and am serious about prepping for any disaster, especially since I live in tornado ally. So far the only thing I have done is to stock 6 months worth of my Rx medicine which I do rotate monthly so they don’t expire. After reviewing my budget I have around $150 of disposable income a month. How would I begin? Does anyone have any advice? Thanks.
It is critical that you be able to control your environment in an emergency.  The place to start is your home.  If you live in an area where it gets very cold in the winter (as in you HAVE to run a heater to survive) then the most critical thing for you is going to be able to heat your home – or rather a section (at least one bedroom) of it.  You’ll want to have a kerosene heater to keep a warm spot in your home.  Here’s a good place to start learning about heating your home in an emergency.
A BOB is the minimum equipment you need (depending on your skill set) to get from point A to point B. It is not meant to last a month or a year or ten years. If you don’t have long term gear at point B and you can’t stay at point A, you’re better off in a FEMA camp. Point B can be anything from a motel to a relative’s house to a cabin deep in the woods someplace but you have to get there when the going gets tough. That’s why a BOB is important. What I think people fail to understand is that what takes 72 hours in good times might take two weeks or more in tough times and that BOB needs to get you through. Hunting, fishing, trapping and foraging are required skills in that case; you can’t rely solely on what you can carry on your back.
Amazing, clever story not narrated to you. This game is based very much off of intelligence and requires a lot of patience (which is a good thing). The art style is incredibly unique and is nice to look at. The game feels like a 1930s animation almost, and it's very atmospheric. The music is fantastic as well - the music used paints pictures and does so gloriously. Don't Starve is a phenomenal game and I highly recommend it to you. See More
Don't Starve is a classic example of "Easy to play, tough to master". The game play is very easy to learn, in fact Don't Starve doesn't really tell you how to play, you just point and click. Some items will be clickable, exploration leads to discoveries, and discoveries lead to longer survival, but death and a new game are always right around the corner. See More
The result is a survival game where surviving is more important than amassing an arsenal of military-grade gear. Although once you’ve figured out how to take care of your body you still have endgame goals such as exploring high security areas, improving your supply of guns, and dabbling with PvP. If you need help with any of that check out our top Scum tips, and if that’s not quite enough help there are some very useful Scum admin commands for you, too.
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