Don't Starve is a classic example of "Easy to play, tough to master". The game play is very easy to learn, in fact Don't Starve doesn't really tell you how to play, you just point and click. Some items will be clickable, exploration leads to discoveries, and discoveries lead to longer survival, but death and a new game are always right around the corner. See More
The game features a massive, open-world sandbox mode in which there are no quests to gate your progress, or artificial boundaries to exploration. The only goal is to survive as long as possible, and to do it by whatever means possible. This free-exploration, open-world design offers plenty of space to roam for those who want to enjoy a more open playstyle without the hindrances of time gates or quest mechanics. Whether you choose to salvage for supplies, hunt the local wildlife, start cooking fires, or simply just take in the view - the freedom to explore and interact with the world in your own way is endless. See More
Skills don’t weigh nuthin. Get it into your head right now that it would be better to know how to make something out of scrap you find than it would to carry it. with enough knowlege, you could get dropped off into the middle of the woods naked and still be able to survive. Sounds kind of fun, actually. Maybe a little painful. Drill, drill, drill. A big part of preparation is rehearsal. Special Forces units practice for months for operations; you should too.
That’s why temperature regulation is so important – and when it comes to regulating temperature in a survival scenario, other than having a roof over your head as shade, there’s nothing more reliable or traditional as fire. That’s why it’s exceedingly important that you have the right materials and equipment on hand to be able to start a fire even in wet conditions. Sure, some people can build fires without equipment, and that’s definitely a useful skill to have – but we strongly recommend you just go ahead and stock up on the resources that make fire building easy. After all, in a disaster situation, you don’t want to make anything more difficult than it needs to be. Having stockpiles for fire-making is even more essential for those of you who live in areas that get colder… but remember, anything under 70 F is already cold for humans, so even if you live in a region with pretty temperate weather, it still probably makes sense to make sure you have everything you need to make your shelter comfortable.
So despite the impression many people got from my “50 Items” article, I don’t think you should pack your bug out bag with as many items as possible. In fact, I think you should check your bag for any non-essential items with a large weight-to-space ratio and remove them. To that end, here’s a list of survival items I’ve seen in various lists online that, in my opinion, you don’t really need in your bug out bag.
This was a great article but I have to say that as far as fire arms go I wouldn’t suggest a .22LR. Yes the ammunition is light and yes you can carry more but in a self defense situaton a .22 isn’t an ideal round. I would suggest if it’s a rifle your looking for go with a .556 NATO or .223 because they are still light weight rounds and they would be more beneficial they are great for defense and hunting larger game. As far as hand guns go a revolver is reliable but the rounds are heavy and most of them are quite bulky a 9mm Luger would be your best bet because they are reliable and the ammunition is one of the common and available round there is so even if you run out obtaining them won’t be that difficult. Plus most full size double stack mags carry around 10-17 rounds which means more rounds before you have to reload.
Jim BI have been prepping for a few years now. The first thing I think sooemne should do as far as food is pack away rice and beans. These combine for a complete protein which is essential for prepping. I have rice and beans packed into mylar bags and 5 gal buckets with O2 absorbers. They last 25-30 years on the shelf.(see Brigham Young’s research into shelf lives of dried food) It is very easy and not too expensive to pack away months worth of rice and beans that you will not have to rotate. Pasta, oats, sugar, can also be packed this way and last up to 30 years. Most serious preppers with families have hundreds of pounds of ric e and beans packed away in buckets. Rice and beans should be a staple of every food preppers plan. Healthy, incredibly long shelf life, filling, cheap.A great idea for emergency rice is to cook your rice. Then put it into a food dehydrator, dehydrate it completely. Then pack away in a mylar bag. When needed you open it up and it does not need to be cooked, only rehydrated. You can pour cold water on it if you need to and let it soak. That way of you are unable to get water boiling for whatever reason, you could still have some rice to eat. Or if you are trying to conserve fuel, just get the water a little warm and pour it on the dehydrated rice. Much less fuel use then boiling the rice. Mountain House sells this in #10 cans but it is cheaper to make your self.You can also dehydrate frozen vegies and pack them away in vacuum seal bags with o2 absorbers and they will last 8-10 years. I can give you links to good web sites if you need to learn how to do anyu of this.
Every bug out bag should be 100% unique. Sure, there are some basic items that every bug out bag should have (food, lighter, water filter, flashlight, etc.), but you should customize your bag based on where you live, what type of disaster is most likely to occur in your area, and how much weight you can carry over a long distance. Many preppers forget about that last point.
Terraria uses a bright color palette and an upbeat chiptune soundtrack to ease you into its world. However, once you start exploring and spend time in it you'll notice it's not as cozy as it first seemed to be. Blood Moons that rouse the dead from their graves. Goblin armies trying to destroy everything in their wake. Vast and dark cave systems, filled with odd creatures and various dangers. Ancient ruins, teeming with the restless dead and evil spirits. Pockets of decaying land, thriving with misshapen monstrosities. It's really fun to explore and discover something new about the world of Terraria. See More

As we mentioned, first and foremost to being a Prepper is a mental attitude.  That of “I am responsible for me”.  If you are relying on the government or others to take care of you then you are a dependent of them, not an independent citizen capable of supporting themselves.  And that is exactly what a Prepper is or strives to be – an Independent Citizen capable of supporting themselves.  Through out the attitudes and beliefs that if something happens you’ll let others take care of you.  In fact, through out the notion that nothing bad will ever happen to you – chances are extremely high that it will!  Whether it’s a personal, family, neighborhood, city, state, national or world event – bad things happen every single day – dodging them all is pretty near impossible.
My husband and I have just started prepping and I can’t read enough information on what we should be doing to prepare. Our biggest questions seem to be about where to find a safe place to go. We live in Ohio right now but plan on moving to Tennessee (Cumberland area) in 3 years. I’ve read a little about the area but I’m not really convinced this is a safe area to stay. Anyone’s thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
You see where we’re going with this? Using nothing but your survival skills, it’s possible to fill in holes in your resource storage. It’s impossible to plan for every eventuality, and the survival conditions that you find yourself dealing with in the event of a massive hurricane are going to be very different from the conditions you might deal with in a global flu pandemic. With the right survival skills and expertise, you’ll be able to build up a base of useful resources like food, water, and shelter items, and hopefully you’ll know enough to improvise the rest. The more you know, the more adaptable you’ll be.

When calamity strikes you’ll still need to eat and if there are no shelters in the vicinity stocked with emergency supplies what are you supposed to do? The answer is the Food Insurance bug out bag that provides you with copious amounts of prepared food sealed in vacuum pouches and ready to be eaten. Every Food Insurance meal has a shelf life of more than a decade and requires only a bit of water to prepare. Everything from lasagna to omelets to rice and beans are here along with the stove to cook them. Add some of your own survival gear like a tactical flashlight, survival knife, emergency blankets and water filter and you’re ready for whatever comes down the pike.
Keep in mind, a well-designed bug out bag should weigh no more than 25% of your body weight, assuming you are in average physical condition and are not overweight. Any heavier than that can make carrying the bag highly strenuous and limit your ability to remain mobile and travel long distances on foot during an evacuation. Limit your packing list to the essentials that will help you survive.
I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
I’d have a small one for each. They should at least have water and some contact info, whistle, and a flashlight with a couple spare batteries. Can’t make it too heavy but that stuff would be nice and you can’t carry everyone’s water. As they get a little older and learn how to use it, they can get more gear but they should learn skills more than have stuff.

Each of your randomly-generated survivors have backstories, providing them with abilities for survival. Ex-firemen are fitter and stronger, while those who used to cook professionally can now feed the starving. But heading out into the world to find the things you need – medicine, ingredients, scrap to make beds – could bring you face-to-face with those willing to kill. And turning a survivor into a murderer leads to misery, depression, and – if not treated well – suicide.

We also need to figure out what kind of survival equipment we need that will make it easier for us to replenish our needs. As an example of this – we need water to survive. But no matter how much clean drinking water you store up, you’ll run out of it at some point. So we need to figure out what kind of gear we need to purify or distill our own water.
Cold weather gloves: A sturdy pair of gloves will provide you with better grip, protect your hands from cuts and splinters, offer warmth in low temperatures, and keeps your hands clean to reduce the risk of infection. In the aftermath of a disaster, you may be tasked with moving fallen branches, gathering firewood, or making your way through broken glass, and high-quality gloves will give you the dexterity to accomplish these tasks.
There are a number of emergency food storage methods that are worth learning about to extend the shelf life of typical stockpile foods. These methods sometimes require modern equipment which you may not want to get your hands on – if that’s the case, you can instead read up on primitive food storage methods, which would include skills like fermentation and smoking/curing meat.
A bug out bag or a tactical backpack,  is a large, accessible, strong, and convenient backpack that you can personalize the contents for your situation. This is a bag that you want to have ready so that you can grab it at a moment’s notice. The pack should always be packed and stored in an accessible place. You never know when you might be forced to leave your home and have to survive on only what is on your back. Not only will you need a pack you will need good quality boots as well.   To help you find the best bug out bag, we have listed out some things to consider when buying.
Pack things that make you self-sufficient – if you are thinking about an item that you will need to pair with something that you are going to need to source on the way, forget it.  If you are moving to safety, the last thing you want to do is worry about scavenging.  Pack complementary and multi-purpose items that can be used both individually and together to save space.

So despite the impression many people got from my “50 Items” article, I don’t think you should pack your bug out bag with as many items as possible. In fact, I think you should check your bag for any non-essential items with a large weight-to-space ratio and remove them. To that end, here’s a list of survival items I’ve seen in various lists online that, in my opinion, you don’t really need in your bug out bag.

Ark has the "alpha" tribe meta going on, where a tribe will rule a server. They routinely wipe all other players' habitats and dinosaurs off of the server for fun, and they also roam to other servers (which Ark supports) and do the same there. They also use every exploit available in this Early Access, very unfinished game to ruin access to the game for anyone on the servers, such as pillaring / turreting critical resource-gathering spots, releasing extremely high-level tames onto the beaches to kill all new players, etc. Your best bet is a good, private unofficial server, but you'll have to do your own research to find one. Good luck! See More
I love the post, and the comments… heck the entire site is ingenious. If I could make a tiny contribution it would be the ICSB kit. It’s something I took away from my earliest days in LRS. It’s true that we seem to have kits within kits (hygiene kit, med kit, fishing kit all packed into a bug out kit) but it’s a handy way of compartmentalising our kit for quick access. Being able to access things quickly quietly and sometimes in the dark can be a lifesaver. So I offer up the ICSB kit. Stands for In Case S#$& Breaks. Some of the items are already on your lists but it’s nice to have them all in the same place when something breaks at the least opportune time. It’s a little pouch with duct tape, bailing wire, super glue, safety pins. Zip ties, key rings, buttons, carpet thread, twine, and anything else that is small and fits into this category. Anyway, that’s my two bits. Thanks for all the good info.
If you think that desperate people won’t come for you, think again. There are rumors that some ex-military types have explicit plans to target preppers in a SHTF scenario, which is why protecting your family and your stockpile should be a consideration for any serious prepper. You need to be aware of the potential enemies of your survival stockpile and take the appropriate steps to ward off anybody or anything that could damage or hinder your survival plans and stockpiles.
For example, relatively near me recently there was a village evacuated from their homes for about a week due to a large damn above the village that was looking likely to burst as the damn wall started crumbling the torrential rain had the water at dangerous levels as it was. People who were home were given minutes to get their sh*t and leave while others were in work away from the danger zone and had zero chance to grab anything. For situations like these a mobile phone, charger, radio, batteries for headtorch etc are a completely rational and extremely likely to be heavily used while you get housed in a local community hall, leisure centre or school etc.
Prepping is getting more mainstream today and there is a lot of information out there now about getting ready for an emergency or in case SHTF, but if you’re new to being a prepper, what should you do first? You need to know how to start prepping. If you’re one of my regular readers, you may be a bit more advanced when it comes to prepping because my typical articles have been for more thorough research. It’s time I start balancing things and have  some articles that have a bit more reach and are more useful to the 99% of people out there looking to prepare their families for emergencies or in case SHTF or even prepping for doomsday.
For me, a walk out would be a huge barrier to overcome, and the potential for catastrophy is in all likelihood a given outcome. Vehicular Bug Out is the only option in that case, and it may not be the option we’re presented with. Bugging In, if possible, is the best option then, even if a power outage is a permanent feature. The pros still outweigh the cons.
2)  Check out the LDS (Mormon) site. They sell a limited number of items to non-church members at ridiculously low prices. I’ve purchased rice, beans, wheat, flour and oats from them. I hear they will even let non-members into the “graineries” if you pre-arrange with the local stake. A grainery I hear has a much larger assortment of foods and you do the actual canning of the foodstuffs. The price is reportedly cheaper too. As of this time I haven’t done this but read a blog where a person did and was very impressed with the selection and prices.
Great read & outstanding list of items. Extremely helpful & very much appreciated. While I’ve found over the decades that there are usually several ways to accomplish most things, focusing on the core items/goal while adapting to the situations & environment an individual(s) find themselves in is crucial. You can have everything known to man & still have limited skills/experience leaving you vulnerable. You can have all the skills but arrogance & overconfidence can do you in. Applicable intelligence, balance in actions/approach to problem solving on the fly & practice with skills/preps can make the difference in most cases. So one has a 35 year supply of beans and rice, great to have no doubt, but who wouldn’t trade some of it for a coke and some M&Ms for normalcy occasionally? That may be just enough encouragement to get the companions/family through to safety. Again, it’s all a wag for the most part…do what preps you can, develop usable skills…plan, persevere & prevail. Fantastic prep checklist & ideas…thanks! Proverbs 27-17…As iron sharpens iron, so on man sharpens another!

The most important factor that will determine the right size bug out bag is your torso size. You can measure your torso by having a friend or casual acquaintance measure the distance from the top of your Iliac Crest (hip bones) up to the bony prominence at the base of your neck (the last cervical vertebrae). Knowing the length of your torso will help you choose a bug out bag that fits comfortably.

MOLLE organization systems are a great added feature for a BOB. MOLLE webbing is straps built into the outside of your pack that allows for additional gear and even other packs to be attached externally. If you have a sturdy pack with MOLLE webbing and carabiners, you can add a lot more gear on the outside of the pack that you otherwise might not have been able to pack inside your BOB.
This con is a bit dependent on RNG. Your character might end up starting in the middle of the snowy mountains with no clothes or the desert with no water, making it hard to survive at the start. Other times the area could be resource poor, making it hard to build a base and tools and weapons. Or, you could end up spawning in an area filled with some of the hardest zombies in the game with no weapons and poor fighting stats. See More

The list of possible areas of interest and the related skills that you can pick up are endless, and almost all of them could prove useful. Being a prepping doesn’t just mean having a huge stockpile off food in your basement – it can be a lot more than that, and go in almost any direction you like. Essentially, if your hobbies or interests could prove useful in a disaster situation, then you can apply that to your prepping by simply changing your frame of mind – instead of purely thinking about something as ‘I’m doing this for fun”, think about it also as ‘I’m doing this to arm myself with a new and useful survival skill”


This may sound like a strange thing to worry about but it may become the biggest mistake you make when a SHTF even really happens. If you don’t watch what you say and do, you could be planning to support 4 people and end up with 12 mouths to feed in an emergency. It would be better to know now that you have to plan for 12 (and hopefully get them on board to help themselves now) or keep the other 8 in the dark about what you’re doing. This is a good time to figure out what you’re going to do with your pets.

Ark has the "alpha" tribe meta going on, where a tribe will rule a server. They routinely wipe all other players' habitats and dinosaurs off of the server for fun, and they also roam to other servers (which Ark supports) and do the same there. They also use every exploit available in this Early Access, very unfinished game to ruin access to the game for anyone on the servers, such as pillaring / turreting critical resource-gathering spots, releasing extremely high-level tames onto the beaches to kill all new players, etc. Your best bet is a good, private unofficial server, but you'll have to do your own research to find one. Good luck! See More
Everyone’s needs when they Bug Out are different. So your Bug Out Bag should suit your needs. Your size/strength, number in party, where you plan to go and for how long will determine what goes in the bag. Bigger groups can share load weights. The only way to determine which bag works for you is to research and try the different sized and designed back packs. In the end, the weight you’ll be carrying may determine whether an external frame or internal frame will be best.
The art direction helps push the idea of hope home, with bright and shiny technologies, beautifully blue oceans, and schools of tropical fish filling your vision at every turn. You explore the ocean depths in your submarine, searching for new materials in marine trenches and among coral reefs. And when you’ve found everything you need, you can begin to construct bases on the ocean floor.
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