Build Quality – The last thing you want is to be trudging through the windswept landscape trying to escape the oncoming storm surge and have your pack split open and spill your survival gear all over the place. The bug out bag should be made of durable, water resistant nylon and have high quality zippers (waterproof if possible) and double stitching all around. The shoulder straps should be firmly affixed to the bag and be well padded to help absorb the load you’re carrying. And if there’s a waist strap it too should be well-padded and preferably adjustable to accommodate people of different heights.
The Wise bug out bag comes equipped with most of the things you’ll need to keep yourself and your loved ones well fed and comfortable during a crisis although you’d do well to take the claim of 32 meals with a grain of salt, since they’re counting a 12 serving whey package as 12 meals. As such you’ll want to use some of the extra space in the bag for additional food which you can pick up at any store that sells mountaineering equipment. As for the rest of the items there’s a well-appointed first aid kit, 5 function emergency whistle, an LED flashlight, dust masks and even a deck of playing cards to keep everyone occupied during those long hours in the storm shelter. The nylon bag is water resistant though not waterproof so keep that in mind, but it’s comfortable and well made. If you’re looking for an affordable, well stocked bug out bag you’d be wise to have the Wise Food bug out bag ready and waiting in the closet.
In the beginning, you might decide to buy food a bit at a time when you make your weekly trip to the grocery store. If you think your budget is just too tight to spend extra money building your reserves, consider this: Skipping the morning latte or the on-the-go-breakfast at the drive-thru can save you $100 a month if you're only spending $5 a day, five days a week. That's about $1,200 a year—plenty to get your emergency supply built up and invest in essential equipment and gear.

So despite the impression many people got from my “50 Items” article, I don’t think you should pack your bug out bag with as many items as possible. In fact, I think you should check your bag for any non-essential items with a large weight-to-space ratio and remove them. To that end, here’s a list of survival items I’ve seen in various lists online that, in my opinion, you don’t really need in your bug out bag.
I have to agree with Steve: I have a bug out bag ready in case the SHTF. That doesn’t mean that there’s going to be a lot of “safe places” to run to. If we get together with like minded people, we can make a long term plan. The only reason for a “three day bag” is if “they” are coming for you specifically and you can go to another sane location. I personally have packed a .22 revolver and 200 rds., carry a .38 Special and pack 100 rds., and shoulder a Saiga .223 carbine with 200 rds. of “penetrators”, FMJ, and some soft point if I need to take a little larger animal. And, another thing, if you pack “pills” in a baggie and happen to get stopped along the way, you can bet on a trip to the station!
It doesn’t matter if you’re preparing for natural disasters, or man made disasters, or other SHTF societal collapse type scenarios. It doesn’t matter which kinds of survival skills you decide to focus on or what kind of prepping you end up doing. What matters the most is the simple understanding that the world can change in an instant, and that we should be ready if and when that happens. That doesn’t mean you need to worry and stress about the potential end of the world – in fact, becoming a prepper should help you sleep easier at night, because you’ll know that if a world ending disaster were to happen, your chances of making it through are much, much higher than the average person.
Each of your randomly-generated survivors have backstories, providing them with abilities for survival. Ex-firemen are fitter and stronger, while those who used to cook professionally can now feed the starving. But heading out into the world to find the things you need – medicine, ingredients, scrap to make beds – could bring you face-to-face with those willing to kill. And turning a survivor into a murderer leads to misery, depression, and – if not treated well – suicide.
Astroneer isn’t quite as bleak as most other survival games, despite being just as treacherous. There’s a gorgeous low-poly art style that promises to soothe you as you crest every new horizon, and then there’s the fact that you can have your pals join you at any time thanks to drop-in/drop-out co-op. There’s a sense of progression in Astroneer, too, as you can eventually blast off and start colonising the other six planets in your solar system, providing tangible goals for you to work towards rather than mere existence.
We had huge barrels that we went to a neighbors pond, with permission, and got water to flush our toilets with. We had chest of ice water, tub full of water. We had collected a hangup shower, cold but a shower! Bug meds etc… Tons of can goods, mre’s and those heater meals! Not to mention we had lots of canned sodas and other sorted drinks. Stay away from the booze for drinking but is great to trade with.
Think about it this way – are you someone who has insurance of any kind? Health insurance? Life insurance? Home owner’s insurance? If you own any kind of insurance, in a way you’re a “prepper”. You’ve prepared for a specific kind of rare but damaging event by purchasing insurance, so that if that event ever happens, your costs are covered and your suffering is lessened by a payout.
For someone new to being a Survivalist building your first Bug Out Bag can seem like a big task. Everybody you read about has been tweaking theirs for months or even years and has a pile of gear built up. It’s hard to know where to start, but if you cover all of the basics in a survival situation you will still be much better off that 99% of the people.
Why didn’t I put this at the beginning of the list? What are you going to say when they start asking you questions? You need to start your research and get into things a bit before you start trying to get buy-in from your family. It’s extremely important, but not the first thing you should be doing. There’s no particular order to this list, BTW but I was just making a point. Make sure you read this article before you talk to any senior citizens in your family. You’ll be surprised at the background and experience that your older family members actually have.
How to Make a Bug Out Bag? – If you decide to make your own bug out bag you’ll want to start with a good-sized, water-resistant backpack and then fill it with a combination of food and practical implements that will allow you to transcend any difficulties you’re likely to encounter. You’ll want to include purified water as well as a water filter (in case the emergency has fouled the local water supply), plenty of freeze dried food along with power bars (but no perishables) and things you can use to protect yourself from the wind, cold and any precipitation that may be falling. Which means you’ll want emergency blankets, dry clothes and rain ponchos. You’ll also want to include other practical implements like a compass, tactical flashlight, walkie talkies, multi tool and more.
Survive and thrive to be victorious in our huge selection of survival games! We have every scenario imaginable for adventurous gamers who love a true challenge. Help townspeople flourish in a post-apocalyptic world, complete with mutant monsters and undead fiends. You can hide from an onslaught of hungry, desperate zombies from The Walking Dead. Or, team up with Ben 10 to save thousands of humans!
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