It is critical that you be able to control your environment in an emergency.  The place to start is your home.  If you live in an area where it gets very cold in the winter (as in you HAVE to run a heater to survive) then the most critical thing for you is going to be able to heat your home – or rather a section (at least one bedroom) of it.  You’ll want to have a kerosene heater to keep a warm spot in your home.  Here’s a good place to start learning about heating your home in an emergency.

#21 is perhaps the most important and I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone include it before. I know people who subsist entirely on dehydrated and canned food so they’ll be ‘used to eating that way’. This makes no sense to me. Enjoy fresh, healthy food while it’s available. This will keep you in better health and more prepared to handle something unexpected. Also, plan for what to do after the storage runs out. Keep a garden now, consider keeping backyard chickens, etc.. work towards learning to make your own cheese, jerky and bread.
Stick with it (and also grab a few friends) and DayZ begins to slowly flourish, however. DayZ as a whole is something of a slow game with human encounters being few and far between, as well as there being a likelihood that they may just kill you outright. It was in Early Access for an obscene and controversial length of time, though its 1.0 update wasn’t without its problems, either.

Survival games have exploded over the past few years. The Steam charts are filled with all kinds of examples, including classic survival horror games and new hardcore survival sims. To help any bewildered adventurers, we’ve gathered together the best survival games to help you pick and choose which emergent stories and unexpected adventures to undertake.
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