A 72 hour bag is a larger version of the bob bag and theoretically holds everything you need to survive for three days. This is highly subjective though, and dependent upon what kind of survival situation you’re in. Your carried water supply should be thought of as separate because it’s one of the most varied survival items based on your situation. A lot of your 72 hours of survival is based on how much water you have. This 5.11 Tactical Rush 72 is a great choice for that, and I’m planning on switching my current pack over to it.


List of contents. You should actually have several lists for your items and one master list to call them out. I use an Excel Spreadsheet with a tab for every bug out bag I own and then laminate a minimized printed copy of each. This can be a huge asset if you need to find a specific item, especially medical kit equipment (which you should have in a designated area anyway). This way you don’t have to dig through all your stuff to get to something.
As mentioned, there are many ways to organize what goes into your survival gear bags or boxes. Each pack should have things from each category represented. Remember: Two is One and One is None. You should overlap different categories so that you’re covered whether you can only grab one survival bag or can get to all of them. Here is how I break down the checklist into different categories of essential survival gear to have in your bob bag:
By choosing the right bug out bag, or set of bug out bags, you can make sure you can carry the thing for longer distances with greater comfort. It doesn’t do any good to pack 80 pounds of emergency gear into a bag and then bug out into the wilderness, only to have to drop 40 pounds of survival gear because you can’t carry it all. You need to practice wearing your gear in whatever terrain you might need it in. What you can put in it will be based on how much you can carry. Don’t forget that you also need to carry water in it. Here are some thoughts on how much water you should carry.
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Even if you’ve got a good stockpile of food going and you’re cycling as needed to keep your emergency stores edible, that doesn’t mean you’re ready for a true disaster. Having everything stored up and ready at home is great, but what if you’re away from home when a true survival scenario occurs? All your preparation and stockpiling means nothing if you don’t have access to it. That’s why you need to also have a get home bag. A get home bag is exactly what it sounds like – it’s a backpack with some emergency supplies that should be enough to get you home safely in the event of something catastrophic or dangerous happening.


If you live in an area that experiences natural disasters that could result in an evacuation, it’s crucial to have a pre-packed bag with sufficient supplies for traveling. Convenient “grab ‘n’ go” survival kits have everything you need to stay safe, and well-fed while making your way to safety. Food, water purification tablets, personal blankets, and other necessities are provided in a duffle bag or backpack, so you don’t have to take the time to gather supplies before heading out. Typical kits contain enough food and water for 4 adults for 3 days.
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